Feature | September 07, 2012| Dave Fornell

CT Auto Coronary Lesion Detection May Improve Rural Hospital Outcomes

Computer-aided detection software for computed tomography may aid in immediate heart attack rule out for chest pain patients

There has been much debate whether computer-aided detection software for computed tomography (CT) to detect coronary blockages is really a worthwhile expense. There has long been apprehension by experienced cardiologists and radiologists who can easily read coronary CT angiography (CCTA) scans for plaque burden. However, the technology may have a niche application for immediate STAT reads of chest pain patients during off-hours, especially at rural medical centers.

Computer-aided detection software is used as a second set of eyes when reading radiology studies for breast or lung cancer and virtual colonoscopy. The software highlights areas that have a high probability of disease based on the optical review data from thousands of radiology studies.

Coronary artery disease blockages are more clear-cut to visualize on good-quality CCTA scans by experienced readers, rather than the detection of the sometimes-subtle shadows of lung cancer. But, at rural hospitals or emergency departments where radiologist experience reading CCTA might be limited, this software may offer a better triage tool. The software can immediately detect if there is coronary disease or not. The software was highlighted during a recent session the Society of Cardiac Computed Tomography (SCCT) annual meeting.

While a diagnosis should not be made solely by software, the absence of disease detection on a CT by the system will generally rule out coronary artery disease, said Robert Schwartz, M.D., FACC, professor of medicine at University of Minnesota Medical School, medical director at the Minnesota Cardiovascular Research Institute and a cardiologist at the Minneapolis Heart Institute. He said CT has a proven, high degree of negative predictability, so if CCTA scan shows there is no evidence of heart disease, it is extremely likely restricted blood flow in the coronary arteries is not the cause of chest pain.

Rcadia Medical Imaging offers the COR Analyzer automated computer-aided detection software for CCTA. It detects coronary lesions, highlights the anatomy and the measures the size of the lesion and degree of anatomical vessel blockage. 

“It’s not perfect, but it’s pretty good,” Schwartz said.

Related Content

Data Science Bowl, second annual, algorithm, heart disease diagnosis
News | Computer-Aided Detection Software| January 04, 2016
Booz Allen Hamilton  and Kaggle announced that the second annual Data Science Bowl will call on the global data science...
recurrent stroke risk, low blood flow, vertebrobasilar region, NOVA, UIC
News | Stroke| December 23, 2015
Patients who have had a stroke in the back of the brain are at greater risk of having another within two years if blood...
Siemens, TwinBeam Dual Energy CT, Somatom Definition, RSNA 2015
Technology | Advanced Visualization| December 21, 2015
Siemens Healthcare’s approach to delivering dose-neutral dual energy images obtained on Somatom computed tomography (CT...
GE Healthcare, Revolution CT family, EVO, RSNA 2015

The Revolution HD expands CT’̈s utility beyond simple anatomy towards tissue characterization through gemstone spectral imaging.  This image used the ASiR iterative reconstruction to create a chest, abdomen, pelvis exam at only 5.8 mSv.

Technology | Computed Tomography (CT)| December 15, 2015
The Revolution CT, Revolution HD and Revolution EVO CT scanners are now offered with a wider range of capabilities to...
Precision Image Analysis, PIA, cardiac MRI post-processing, Core Lab, RSNA 2015
Technology | Cardiac Imaging| December 15, 2015
Precision Image Analysis Inc. (PIA) announced a dramatic expansion of its capabilities as a provider of medical imaging...
Materialise, Mimics Innovation Suite, U.S. expansion, 3-D printing

Ariana Smith, a 17-year-old Taylor. Mich., teen, became the first patient at the Children's Hospital of Michigan, a part of the Detroit Medical Center (DMC), and the first in Michigan, to benefit from a revolutionary 3-D printed heart model, produced by Materialise that helped heart specialists in selecting the right tools for her treatment.

Feature | 3-D Printing| December 14, 2015
Citing increased use of its Materialise Mimics Innovation Suite in hospitals and other clinical settings, Materialise...

An example of a 3-D printed aortic valve with calcified areas highlighted in blue that Vital exhibited as the types of on-demand 3-D printing that can be done with its new service.

Technology | December 14, 2015
December 14, 2015 — Vital Images Inc.
vessel assist, CTO fusion imaging

An example of Vessel Assist used to create vessel centerlines through a CTO to help guide revascularization in the cath lab.

Technology | Cath Lab Navigation Aids| December 14, 2015
December 14, 2015 — As the field of interventional medicine grows, so do the challenges for clinicians to plan, guide
Sponsored Content | Videos | Cardiac Imaging| December 11, 2015
ITN/DAIC Editor Dave Fornell shows his choices for some of the most innovative new imaging technologies on the expo f
Sponsored Content | Videos | RSNA 2015| December 11, 2015
Video discussion of new technology and trend highlights at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015 meet
Overlay Init