Feature | May 16, 2013

Nearly 50 Percent of Patients With Cardiac Device Infections Don’t Survive Beyond Three Years

New study of Medicare patients presented at 2013 Heart Rhythm Society Meeting

May 16, 2013 — The incremental mortality in implantable pacemaker and defibrillator recipients who experience a device infection, compared to patients without device infection, is substantial and persists for at least three years after index hospitalization with infection. These are the key findings of a retrospective cohort study of 200,219 Medicare fee-for-service patients undergoing cardiac device procedures, with and without infection, that were presented today by M. Rizwan Sohail, M.D., a researcher from the Mayo Clinic divisions of infectious diseases and cardiovascular diseases, at Heart Rhythm 2013, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 34th Annual Scientific Sessions.

Previously, Sohail and his collaborators have reported that patients with cardiac device infections experience a two-fold increase in the mortality rate one year after device implantation, compared to patients without an infection. In this new study, Sohail and collaborators looked at the long-term mortality three years after the device procedure in 200,219 Medicare beneficiaries that underwent permanent pacemaker and defibrillator procedures between Jan. 1, 2007 and Dec. 31, 2007, including 5,817 patients with cardiac device infections.

Key findings of the study included:

  • The 15-29 percent higher mortality seen in patients with cardiac device infections, compared to patients without cardiac device infections, continued for at least three years.
  • Three years after the procedure:
    • Patients with pacemakers (PM) infection had 54 percent mortality, vs. 33 percent without PM infection (P<0.001)
    • Patients with ICD infection had 48 percent mortality vs. 32 percent without ICD infection (P<0.001)
    • Patients with CRT-D infections had a 51 percent mortality vs. 37 percent without CRT-D infection (p<0.001)
  • For PM patients with a device infection, the incremental mortality associated with device infection continues to increase for at least three years.

“It is well known that cardiac device therapies such as pacemakers, implanted cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), and cardiac resynchronization therapy/defibrillators (CRT-Ds) can reduce morbidity and mortality in appropriately selected patients,” said Sohail, “Unfortunately, these benefits can be significantly reduced, if the implantation/replacement procedure is complicated by a device infection. The focus of this study was to better understand the long-term mortality associated with CIED infections, stratified for different cardiac device types.”

This study was funded by Tyrx Inc., maker of implantable combination drug/device products focused on infection control for implantable electrophysiology devices.

For more information: www.HeartDeviceInfection.com

Related Content

Boston Scientific, HeartLogic Heart Failure Diagnostic Service, MultiSENSE trial data, AHA Scientific Sessions 2016
News | Heart Failure| November 18, 2016
Boston Scientific recently announced results from the first clinical trial evaluating the performance of the HeartLogic...
atrial fibrillation, warfarin, dementia, Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute, American Heart Association, AHA Scientific Sessions 2016
News | Atrial Fibrillation| November 15, 2016
Atrial fibrillation patients who use warfarin to lower risk of stroke are at higher risk of developing dementia than...
Medtronic, Claria MRI Quad CRT-D SureScan, FDA approval
Technology | Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Devices (CRT)| November 15, 2016
Medtronic plc  has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for the Claria MRI Quad Cardiac...
catheter ablations, atrial fibrillation, stroke risk, Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute study, AHA Scientific Sessions, American Heart Association
News | Ablation Systems| November 14, 2016
Atrial fibrillation patients with a prior history of stroke who undergo catheter ablation lower their long-term risk of...
Sponsored Content | Videos | Heart Valve Technology| November 14, 2016
William Abraham, M.D., FACC, discusses advances in heart failure device treatment technologies at the Transcatheter C
genetic testing, sudden cardiac death of teen, Mayo Clinic Proceedings
News | Genetic Testing| November 09, 2016
The recent, sudden death of a 13-year-old boy resulted in more than 20 relatives being incorrectly diagnosed as having...
transcatheter aortic valve replacement, pacemakers, implantation, post-TAVR implantation, worse outcomes, study
News | EP Lab| November 09, 2016
Patients who undergo minimally invasive heart valve replacement, known as transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR...
RFID inventory control in the cath lab, inventory management, cardinal

An example of RFID cabinets in a cath lab. As items are pulled from the cabinet, the inventory control system automatically determines what items were take out and adds them to the patient case. The system can also help locate recalled or expired items, and automatically track on-hand inventory to avoid manual counts.

Feature | Inventory Management| October 28, 2016 | Jean-Claude Saghbini
The healthcare industry’s transition to value-based care leaves no room for waste, and yet we know that inefficiency
Sponsored Content | Videos | Sudden Cardiac Arrest| October 28, 2016
It is critical to educate patients who are at risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), so Rahul Doshi, M.D., director of
Overlay Init