Feature | January 29, 2014

Ultrasound Building Utility Outside Cardiology

Cardiac Ultrasound Systems Point-of-Care Cardiology Clinical Study
January 19, 2014 — A paper in the journal of the World Heart Federation, Global Heart, reported mounting evidence of the utility of ultrasound in areas outside its traditional field of cardiology, with increasing use reported in general hospital wards, clinics and pre-hospital environments. The paper is by Associate Professor Bret Nelson and Dr. Amy Sanghvi, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York.
 
"The pervasive use of focused ultrasound is perhaps most evident in the advent of ultrasound training in undergraduate medical curricula," the authors said. They refer to a 2011 review paper that highlighted the growing use of point-of-care ultrasound by clinicians in over 20 specialties. "Increased training by clinicians across many specialties, coupled with technology improvements yielding lower cost and better quality studies, have contributed to this trend.”
 
The authors said prognostic value of emergency physician-performed cardiac ultrasound has been demonstrated. Several studies have shown that no cardiac arrest patients without cardiac activity evident on ultrasound survived resuscitation. In general hospital wards and clinics, many studies have addressed the use of point-of-care ultrasound. A clinic-based study of first-year medical students instructed in the use of ultrasound demonstrated they were able to detect pathology in 75 percent of patients with known cardiac disease, where board-certified cardiologists using stethoscopes could detect only 49 percent. Pocket-sized ultrasound devices were used by general practitioners (GPs) in Norway to assess left ventricular function in patients with suspected heart failure. Here, 92 patients were assessed by GPs as well as cardiologists, and the measurements obtained with ultrasound by GPs correlated well with those obtained by cardiologists.
 
In environments where ambulances are staffed by physicians, Breitkreutz et al assessed patients in cardiac arrest as well as those receiving peri-arrest care. The FEEL (Focused Echocardiography Evaluation in Life Support) study demonstrated cardiac ultrasound changed management in 89 percent of the cardiac arrest patients and 66 percent of peri-arrest patients. The possibility also exists for ambulances to transmit ultrasound images to the in-hospital emergency teams awaiting arrival of incoming patients, with potentially life-saving implications.
 
The authors also refer to examples of ultrasound included in medical education curricula in Germany and the United States. 
 
For more information: www.globalheart-journal.com

Related Content

Epsilon Imaging, EchoInsight, left ventricle, LV measurement, strain imaging, ASE 2016
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound| June 17, 2016
Epsilon Imaging Inc. announced a research study was presented at the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) 2016...
ZOOM+Imaging, on-demand service, X-ray, ultrasound, CT
News | Business| June 15, 2016
ZOOM+ announced the launch of ZOOM+Imaging, a proprietary digital platform for on-demand scheduling, paying and sharing...
hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, HCM, strain echocardiography, risk assessment, ASE 2016
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound| June 13, 2016
After following a large sub-set of patients, researchers found that by using strain echocardiography they could...
ASE 2016, Mayo Clinic study, echocardiography, aortic flow rate, patient risk stratification
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound| June 13, 2016
Researchers from Mayo Clinic believe they have found a better way to risk stratify some of their most fragile patients.
ASE 2016, echocardiography, telemedicine, Arkansas, pediatric patients
News | Telecardiology| June 13, 2016
Two new research studies verify that echocardiography, linked to experts through telemedicine, can provide better and...
cardiac ultrasound, ASE, American society of echo
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound| June 09, 2016
Below is a roundup of recent echo news that highlights technologies and topics that will be featured at the American
TeleHealthRobotics, Tele-Robotic Ultrasound, TRUDI, robotic ultrasound

The Tele-Robotic Ultrasound for Distance Imaging (TRUDI) system uses a robotic arm so a remote sonographer can control the echo probe without the need for them to be in the same room or even be in the hospital during an exam or procedure. 

News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound| June 09, 2016
June 9, 2016 — The American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) will host Echovation Challenge 2016, a competition for
ASE 2016, echocardiography, Seattle
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound| June 01, 2016
The American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) will host its 27th Annual Scientific Sessions, June 10-14, 2016, at the...
Technology | Cardiac Imaging| May 18, 2016
May 18, 2016 — The Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC) recently announced its launch of the IAC QI Self-Asse
Siemens, Acuson S3000 ultrasound system, HELX Evolution with Touch Control, usability study, Macadamian Technologies
News | Ultrasound Imaging| May 17, 2016
Macadamian Technologies, a user experience research, design and software development firm, recently announced the...
Overlay Init