Ultrasound Delivery of Clot-Busting Drugs May Lessen Risk of Bleeding in Thrombolysis

 

January 22, 2009

January 22, 2009 - Delivering clot-busting drugs with an ultrasound-enhanced delivery system could reduce the amount of drugs needed to break up dangerous blood clots in the legs and pelvis, according to discussions surrounding a live case demonstration at the 21st annual International Symposium on Endovascular Therapy (ISET).

In a live case preformed yesterday viewed by hundreds of endovacular specialists, Constantino Peña, M.D., an interventional radiologist at Baptist Cardiac and Vascular Institute in Miami, treated a 74-year-old male with a blocked leg artery. Dr. Peña delivered the drug Tenecteplase (TNK) to the clot via ultrasound-accelerated catheter-directed thrombolysis, and the clot was completely dissolved upon examination 12 hours later.

In a discussion of the live case, Dr. Peña indicated that the amount of TNK used to dissolve the clot was half what is typically used. Lowering the amount of drug needed to dissolve clots can significantly reduce the risk of major bleeding, according to Barry Katzen, M.D., founder and medical director of Baptist Cardiac and Vascular Institute.

The International Symposium on Endovascular Therapy (ISET) is attended by more than 1,200 physicians, scientists, allied health professionals and industry professionals from around the world. The meeting pioneered the use of live cases to promote the multidisciplinary treatment of cardiac and vascular disease by endovascular means. ISET is presented by the Baptist Cardiac and Vascular Institute, Miami.

For more information: www.ISET.org