Feature | December 23, 2013

WHO Study: Atrial Fibrillation is a Growing Global Health Concern

December 23, 2013 — Atrial fibrillation (AF), long considered the most common condition leading to an irregular heartbeat, is a growing and serious global health problem, according to the first study ever to estimate the condition’s worldwide prevalence, death rates and societal costs.
 
The World Health Organization (WHO) data analysis, led by Sumeet Chugh, M.D., associate director, Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, shows 33.5 million people worldwide — or 0.5 percent of the world’s population — have the condition. Funded partly by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute, the analysis was conducted with the assistance of the University of Washington University’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.
 
The study, believed to be the first to determine the number of people globally with AF, is published online in the peer reviewed medical journal Circulation and is scheduled to be published in the Feb. 25 print edition of the journal.
 
“Atrial fibrillation has a huge cost in every sense of the word,” said Chugh. “It can lead to stroke, hospitalization, as well as lost productivity. Our findings indicate that atrial fibrillation is on the rise around the world and it’s a huge public health burden.”
 
During the analysis, Chugh and a team of researchers systematically analyzed data from selected population-based research studies — from among 1,784 published medical research studies on AF — to estimate global and regional prevalence, incidence and mortality related to this condition.
 
“Finding out the scope of the problem is step No. 1,” said Chugh. “Our hope is that we can develop a sustainable global plan to manage atrial fibrillation and find new and effective ways of preventing this condition.”
 
Among the study’s findings:
  • In 1990, an estimated 570 of 100,000 men had AF. In 2010, the prevalence rate for men was 596 of 100,000.
  • For females, an estimated 360 of 100,000 women had AF in 1990. In 2010, that rose to 373 of 100,000.
  • In 1990, the number of new cases of AF in men was estimated at 61 per 100,000. In 2010, the number of men with new cases of AF rose to 78 per 100,000.
  • The number of new cases of AF in women was 43 per 100,000 in 1990. In 2010, the number of new cases in women was 60 per 100,000.
  • Although deaths linked to AF are rising around the world, more women with AF are dying in developing countries. In the United States, deaths linked to AF now are comparable between the sexes.
 
“A lot more research is needed to fully understand this continuing worldwide increase,” said Chugh. “Although the chance of developing atrial fibrillation does increase with age, these findings are not entirely explained by the aging world population. Several other factors have been suggested and need to be better evaluated, from obesity and hypertension to air pollution.”
 
For more information: cedars-sinai.edu, circ.ahajournals.org

Related Content

TCT 2016, TCT.16, main arena, late breaking trials, transcatheter cardiovascular therapeutics

There were several hot topics that came out of the 2016 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) annual meeting Oct. 29 - Nov. 2, which made this month's top 20 list, including several videos. Number 4 on the list of content was the result of the EXCEL Trial key TCT late-breaker, which showed stenting is equal in outcomes to surgery for the first time, when using one of the latest generation drug-eluting stents. 

Feature | December 05, 2016
December 5, 2016 — Here is the list of the top 20 most popular pieces of content on the Diagnostic and Interventional
coronary CT angiography, CCTA, alcohol consumption, CAD, coronary artery disease, RSNA 2016
News | CT Angiography (CTA)| November 29, 2016
Researchers using coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) found no association between light to moderate...
News | Cath Lab| November 21, 2016
November 21, 2016 – A single-center study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NHLBI) failed to show an ea
InspireMD, CGuard embolic protection system, EPS, clinical data, internal carotid artery stenosis, ICA
News | Stents Carotid| November 18, 2016
November 18, 2016 — InspireMD Inc.
Boston Scientific, HeartLogic Heart Failure Diagnostic Service, MultiSENSE trial data, AHA Scientific Sessions 2016
News | Heart Failure| November 18, 2016
Boston Scientific recently announced results from the first clinical trial evaluating the performance of the HeartLogic...
cardiac rehabilitation, depression, death risk, heart surgery, Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute, AHA Scientific Sessions 2016
News | Cardiac Rehabilitation| November 15, 2016
Depression has been known to be associated with poor cardiovascular outcomes. But if patients who are depressed attend...
atrial fibrillation, warfarin, dementia, Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute, American Heart Association, AHA Scientific Sessions 2016
News | Atrial Fibrillation| November 15, 2016
Atrial fibrillation patients who use warfarin to lower risk of stroke are at higher risk of developing dementia than...
Medtronic, Claria MRI Quad CRT-D SureScan, FDA approval
Technology | Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Devices (CRT)| November 15, 2016
Medtronic plc  has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for the Claria MRI Quad Cardiac...
PET/CT, calcium blockages, heart attack risk, Intermountain study, American Heart Association, AHA Scientific Sessions 2016
News | PET-CT| November 15, 2016
Many people who experience chest pain but don’t have a heart attack breathe a big sigh of relief when a stress test...
bivalirudin, heparin, blood clot prevention medication, PCI, percutaneous coronary intervention, Intermountain study, AHA Scientific Sessions
News | Antiplatelet and Anticoagulation Therapies| November 14, 2016
Two differing blood clot prevention medications are just as safe and effective for patients undergoing percutaneous...
Overlay Init