Articles

Transradial catheterization is increasingly becoming the access site of choice for many hospitals throughout the United States. Completing the procedure through the arm offers greater satisfaction...

When a lab is transitioning from transfemoral to transradial cardiac catheterizations, the process can be either encouraging or discouraging to all staff involved. To ease the transition, it might be...
There were 15 abstracts presented describing radial access and intervention during the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and i2 Summit meeting in April in New Orleans. The abstracts focused on...
The RIVAL trial shows there is no difference in rates of composite death, myocardial infarction, stroke or major bleeding between radial access and femoral access strategies, but radial access...

April 8, 2011 — In the largest randomized trial to compare radial access and femoral access for coronary angiography and intervention, researchers found radial access reduced rates of vascular...

With the increased use of transradial cardiac catheterization throughout hospitals across the country, several results have become apparent. Transradial catheterization has been shown to have...

Transradial Approach (Left vs. Right) and Procedural Times During Coronary Procedures: TALENT study
Alessandro Sciahbasi, et al. American Heart Journal, 2011,...

Radial artery occlusion rate during transradial access procedures is strongly related to sheath and catheter size. Although worldwide most experienced practitioners (90 percent) use 5 and 6 French...

In January the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a big modifcation to the CoreValve U.S. pivotal clinical trial — eliminating the medical management arm of the study.

When it comes to interventional cardiology, increasing diagnostic confidence and reducing exam time are paramount to improving overall patient care.