Articles

Outside the United States, transradial artery access is used in 50-90 percent of percutaneous interventions over femoral access, while U.S. usage rates are less than 5 percent. However, a patient...

Transradial access is slowly gaining ground in the United States as more physicians make the switch due to greatly reduced bleeding complications, increased patient comfort and earlier ambulation...

Radial access is very popular outside the United States because it offers improved safety, comfort and cost savings over femoral access, which is the current U.S. standard of care. Femoral access...

St. Joseph's Hospital of Atlanta created a radial access recover room that replaces beds and the sterile institutional hospital look with a more patient-friendly design.

In the current economy where hospitals are tightening their belts to help get through tough times, technology can aid in cost cutting by increasing physician and staff efficiency.

Interventionalists using radial instead of femoral access say it significantly cuts bleeding complications, infection rates, readmissions and aids patient comfort and ambulation.

During TCT 2009 this past fall in Washington D.C. I had the chance to listen to Shigeru Saito, M.D., FACC, ShonanKamakura General Hospital, Sapporo, Japan, explain reasons why he feels transradial...

Safe delivery of the balloon or stent through fragile vasculature during percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) procedures is an important criterion for successful patient outcomes...