Feature | May 16, 2013

Nearly 50 Percent of Patients With Cardiac Device Infections Don’t Survive Beyond Three Years

New study of Medicare patients presented at 2013 Heart Rhythm Society Meeting

May 16, 2013 — The incremental mortality in implantable pacemaker and defibrillator recipients who experience a device infection, compared to patients without device infection, is substantial and persists for at least three years after index hospitalization with infection. These are the key findings of a retrospective cohort study of 200,219 Medicare fee-for-service patients undergoing cardiac device procedures, with and without infection, that were presented today by M. Rizwan Sohail, M.D., a researcher from the Mayo Clinic divisions of infectious diseases and cardiovascular diseases, at Heart Rhythm 2013, the Heart Rhythm Society’s 34th Annual Scientific Sessions.

Previously, Sohail and his collaborators have reported that patients with cardiac device infections experience a two-fold increase in the mortality rate one year after device implantation, compared to patients without an infection. In this new study, Sohail and collaborators looked at the long-term mortality three years after the device procedure in 200,219 Medicare beneficiaries that underwent permanent pacemaker and defibrillator procedures between Jan. 1, 2007 and Dec. 31, 2007, including 5,817 patients with cardiac device infections.

Key findings of the study included:

  • The 15-29 percent higher mortality seen in patients with cardiac device infections, compared to patients without cardiac device infections, continued for at least three years.
  • Three years after the procedure:
    • Patients with pacemakers (PM) infection had 54 percent mortality, vs. 33 percent without PM infection (P<0.001)
    • Patients with ICD infection had 48 percent mortality vs. 32 percent without ICD infection (P<0.001)
    • Patients with CRT-D infections had a 51 percent mortality vs. 37 percent without CRT-D infection (p<0.001)
  • For PM patients with a device infection, the incremental mortality associated with device infection continues to increase for at least three years.

“It is well known that cardiac device therapies such as pacemakers, implanted cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), and cardiac resynchronization therapy/defibrillators (CRT-Ds) can reduce morbidity and mortality in appropriately selected patients,” said Sohail, “Unfortunately, these benefits can be significantly reduced, if the implantation/replacement procedure is complicated by a device infection. The focus of this study was to better understand the long-term mortality associated with CIED infections, stratified for different cardiac device types.”

This study was funded by Tyrx Inc., maker of implantable combination drug/device products focused on infection control for implantable electrophysiology devices.

For more information: www.HeartDeviceInfection.com

Related Content

Biotronik Home Monitoring implanted EP device remote wireless monitoring system
News | May 24, 2017
May 23, 2017 – Results now published in the European Heart Journal show Biotronik Home Monitoring reduces th
Sponsored Content | Videos | Pacemakers| May 23, 2017
Vivek Reddy, M.D., director of cardiac arrhythmia services and professor of medicine, cardiology, Mount Sinai Hospita
Sponsored Content | Videos | Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Devices (CRT)| May 23, 2017
This video, provided by ERB, demonstrates the function and implantation of the WiSE CRT (Wireless Stimulation Endocar
Sponsored Content | Videos | Atrial Fibrillation| May 17, 2017
Hugh Calkins, M.D., FACC, FAHA, FHRS, director of cardiac arrhythmia services and professor of medicine at Johns Hopk
Biosense Webster multi-electrode RF ablation balloon

Biosense Webster's multi-electrode RF ablation balloon with irrigation. The system allows operators to change the energy levels of each electrode to avoid damaging sensitive underlying critical structures like the esophagus or phrenic nerve.

Feature | Ablation Systems| May 17, 2017 | Dave Fornell
May 17, 2017 – Clinical trial results from a first-in-human study evaluating the acute feasibility of an investigatio
Sponsored Content | Videos | EP Lab| May 17, 2017
This video, provided by Spectranetics, demonstrates how to deploy the Bridge Occlusion Balloon used to seal accidenta
Spectranetics Bridge Occlusion Balloon in the SVC

An illustration of how the Bridge balloon can seal the SVC after an accidental tear from lead extration.

Feature | EP Lab| May 17, 2017 | Dave Fornell
May 17, 2017 — A new intravenous occlusion balloon designed to seal any accidental tears in the superior vena cava (S
micra leadless pacemaker
Feature | Pacemakers| May 16, 2017
May 16, 2017 - The preliminary results for the Medtronic Micra Transcatheter Pacing System (TPS) Post-Approval Regist
Medtronic Reveal Linq implantable cardiac monitor

The Medtronic Reveal Linq implantable cardiac monitor is the smallest implantable monitor on the market. It is used as a long-term Holter monitor for 24-hour a day, 365-day a year patient monitoring. The device uses wireless connectivity to download the patient data with a patient bedside base unit to send the information over the internet so it is accessible by physicians.

Feature | Atrial Fibrillation| May 16, 2017
May 16, 2017 - The study using small, subcutaneous implantable cardiac monitors for long-term, 24-hour a day monitori
Overlay Init