Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 14, 2020

Rapid Drop in Heart Attacks and Stroke at Hospitals Concerns ACC 

American College of Cardiology is urging patients who have symptoms to call 911 and seek medical help

The ACC began a campaign to encourage patients with heart attack and stroke symptoms to go to the hospital, because there has been a large drop in theses cases since the start of COVID-19. #COVID19 #coronavirus #SARScov2

This is an infographic that is part of a new ACC campaign targeting patients amid the COVID-19 pandemic, encourage anyone with heart attack and stroke symptoms to go to the hospital. There has been a major drop in these cases from normal levels since the start of COVID-19. 

April 14, 2020 — Since the start of COVID-19 containment efforts across the U.S. in March 2020, there has been a massive drop in the normal number of heart attack and stroke cases showing up at hospitals across the country. This has raised concerns that patients are not seeking medical attention because of fears about going to the hospital. 

American College of Cardiology (ACC) is now urging people with what appear to be heart attack and stroke symptoms to seek medical help. The ACC said statistics for emergency rooms (ER) visits show major drops in heart attack, stroke amid the COVID-19 pandemic. The ACC is offering new CardioSmart resources outline to help patients determine when and how to seek help.

Through its CardioSmart patient initiative, the ACC has issued guidance to encourage patients experiencing a heart attack or stroke to call 911. Experts worry that patients who need critical care are delaying their treatment over concerns about the novel coronavirus (COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2).

“Due to fears of contracting COVID-19 or taking up space in hospitals, patients experiencing a heart attack or stroke are delaying their essential care, causing a new public health crisis,” said Martha Gulati, M.D., FACC, editor-in-chief of CardioSmart.org. “Hospitals and catheterization labs are still treating heart attack and stroke, not just COVID-19, and are taking the utmost precautions to ensure that the novel coronavirus not be spread. The faster a patient is treated, the higher the outcome of survival and lower the risk for complications. No patient should delay their care.”

A new CardioSmart infographic, “Coronavirus and Your Heart: Don’t Ignore Heart Symptoms,” encourages patients to pay close attention to heart attack or stroke symptoms, particularly if they have a pre-existing heart condition, and call 911 immediately if they believe they’re having a heart attack or stroke. The infographic details common heart attack and stroke symptoms and ensures hospitals are taking steps to protect them from COVID-19. The infographic also encourages patients to continue routine heart care to ensure they stay healthy, which may be accomplished through telehealth using a remote or virtual visit, or a phone call with their clinician.

“We encourage clinicians to widely distribute these tools to their patients. Make sure that patients know when telehealth is an appropriate option, and when they should call 911 instead,” Gulati said. “Clinicians should work with patients to ensure medication adherence, and always continue to advocate for heart-healthy measures that can be taken even in times of self-isolation and social distancing.”

CardioSmart serves as the ACC’s patient engagement initiative. Reviewed by experts in the CardioSmart COVID-19 Response Work Group, the new infographic joins the full collection of ACC COVID-19 resources, including clinical bulletins, journal articles, patient summaries and more. 

For more information about how COVID-19 affects patients with pre-existing heart conditions, and to download the full infographic, visit the https://www.cardiosmart.org/Coronavirus.

The drop in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) heart attack cases was noted in an interview with William O’Neill, M.D., director of the structural heart proigram at Henry Ford Hospital in the VIDEO: Impact of COVID-19 on the Cardiovascular Program at Henry Ford Hospital.

Find more information at the ACC COVID-19 Hub

 

 

Related COVID-19 Cardiology Content:

VIDEO: Triage Considerations for Structural Heart Patients During COVID-19 From ACC and SCAI — Interview with Etisham Mahmud, M.D.

Cardiologists Run the First Large-scale U.S. Study on Hydroxychloroquine COVID-19 Prophylaxis Begins in Detroit

New York City Physicians Note Multiple Cardiovascular Presentations of COVID-19

VIDEO: Cancelling Non-essential Cardiac Procedures During the COVID-19 Outbreak — Interview with Ehtisham Mahmud, M.D.

ACC COVID-19 recommendations for the cardiovascular care team

VIDEO: What Cardiologists Need to Know about COVID-19 — Interview with Thomas Maddox, M.D.

AHA, ACC, HRS Caution Use of COVID-19 Therapies Hydroxychloroquine and Azithromycin in Cardiac Patients

FDA Approves ECMO to Treat COVID-19 Patients

COVID-19 STEMI Registry Created to Study Acute Cardiovascular Effects of the Virus

Image Gallery Showing Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic

VIDEO: Best Practices for Nuclear Cardiology During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Related Content

The American College of Cardiology (ACC) released a list of the latest practice-changing presentations at the ACC.20 annual meeting March 28-30, 2020, in Chicago. This includes five late-breaking clinical trial (LBCT) sessions and three featured clinical research sessions. There also are two LBCT deep-dive sessions where the experts will break down the hottest trials and attendees can find out what the impact might be on the practice of cardiology and patients.
Feature | ACC | April 09, 2020 | Dave Fornell, Editor
Here is the list of American College of Cardiology (ACC) practice-
ACC Cancels 2020 Conference Amid Coronavirus Concerns. #COVID19 #coronavirus #2019nCoV
Feature | ACC | March 09, 2020 | Dave Fornell, Editor
March 9, 2020 — Less than week after the American College of Cardiolog...
American College of Cardiology Names Douglas Drachman Next Annual Scientific Session Vice Chair

Image courtesy of Massachusetts General Hospital

News | ACC | October 08, 2019
Douglas Drachman, M.D., FACC, has been selected as the next vice chair of the American College of Cardiology’s (ACC)...
SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps pressure readings onto angiogram. Results from an international study presented at ACC 2019 indicates pressure readings obtained using iFR (instantaneous wave-free ratio, also referred to as instant wave-free ratio or instant flow reserve) in coronary arteries may localize stenoses that remain after interventions. FFR in the cath lab.

SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps pressure readings onto angiogram. Results from an international study presented at ACC 2019 indicates pressure readings obtained using iFR (instantaneous wave-free ratio, also referred to as instant wave-free ratio or instant flow reserve) in coronary arteries may localize stenoses that remain after interventions.

Feature | ACC | March 27, 2019 | Greg Freiherr, Contributing Editor
The fingerprints of value-added medicine were all over products and works-in-progress on the exhibit floor of the a

The opening late-breaking trial at ACC 2019 is the Apple Heart Study, a large-scale, app-based study to identify atrial fibrillation using a smartwatch. Earlier, smaller trials showed this approach might be used in a population health application to proactively identify AFib patients earlier.

Feature | ACC | March 19, 2019
The American College of Cardiology (ACC) released a list of the late
A patient who received HeartMate III LVAD system at ACC.18. The HeartMate 3 was the topic of of the the key late-breaking trials at #ACC18

A patient who received the HeartMate III LVAD system showing off his external battery pack. He served as a patient ambassador in the Abbott booth at ACC.18. The HeartMate III, with its magnetic levitated pump, showed a big reduction in clotting over previous LVADs in a key late-breaking trial at this year's conference.

Feature | ACC | March 27, 2018 | Dave Fornell
There were several notable presentations of new data on cardiovascular technologies at the recent 2018 American Colle
Drug Stops Dangerous Bleeding in Patients Taking Factor Xa Inhibitors

Connolly 

News | ACC | March 22, 2018
March 22, 2018 — The experimental drug...
Videos | ACC | March 21, 2018
DAIC Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new technologies on the expo floor at
ACC 2018 Late-Breaking Trials Announced
News | ACC | March 21, 2018
Here is a list of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2018 annual meeting late-breaking clinical trials presente
Inhaled Therapy Ineffective in Difficult-to-Treat Heart Failure at ACC 2018.

Image from presentation, "Inorganic Nitrite Delivery to Improve Exercise Capacity in HFpEF: The INDIE-HFpEF Trial," Borlaug

News | ACC | March 20, 2018
March 20, 2018 — Four weeks of treatment with a novel inhaled medication failed to improve exercise capacity, daily a