News | December 28, 2012

Children's Healthcare of Atlanta Develops Smart Phone App for Early Detection of Heart Defects in Newborns

Pediatric cardiologists at Children's Sibley Heart Center lead the development of new protocols that save infants' lives

Pulse Oximetry Screening Pulse Ox Tool critical congenital heart defect Software

December 28, 2012 — Pulse Oximetry Screening is a life-saving test that can detect critical congenital heart defects (CCHD) in newborn babies before an infant is discharged from the hospital. The test is easy to perform, however, appropriate interpretation of the results can be challenging. In order to aid health care providers in interpreting the results of the screening, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta has created the Pulse Ox Tool, a ground-breaking app for smart phones that automates the Pulse Oximetry Screening test and improves the accuracy of detecting children with possible CCHD.

"Research shows that this simple screening test for newborn babies can help prevent the delay of diagnosis of critical congenital heart defects in infants," says Matt Oster, M.D., M.P.H., a pediatric cardiologist at Children's Sibley Heart Center who led the development of the digital tool. "We are thrilled to premiere this revolutionary tool to newborn nurseries and pediatric hospitals across the country. The convenience of downloading the app for free to your smart phone makes increased precision of care available to all providers."

In 2011, the Secretary of Health and Human Services committee, led by William Mahle, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Children's Sibley Heart Center, recommended that pulse oximetry screening be added to the routine uniform screening panel that every newborn baby receives after birth. Mahle led a team that developed the methods for implementing the screening, which includes an algorithm that uses pulse oximetry readings to determine whether patients need immediate further testing for CCHD. Without this test, many babies with heart defects show no symptoms at birth but go into heart failure a few weeks later.

While not a difficult equation, the mathematics required to manually compute the algorithm sometimes produces user error. To remedy this, Oster led a team to create the Pulse Ox Tool, an app for smart phones that automates the calculation of the algorithm, thereby decreasing the chance for errors. Upon testing the Web-based Pulse Ox Tool at Children's Sibley Heart Center, it was determined that the computer-based algorithm's error rate was significantly lower than when the algorithm was manually computed by providers.

Pulse Ox Tool is now available for free download on iTunes, Google Play and Windows, as well as in a web-based version at www.pulseoxtool.com.

Research efforts for this application are being conducted under the Children's Center for Cardiovascular Biology. This effort is part of the Emory+Children’s Pediatric Research Center led by Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University, including partnerships with the Georgia Institute of Technology and Morehouse School of Medicine.

For more information: www.choa.org

 

Related Content

Cerner and Duke Clinical Research Institute Collaborate on Cardiac Risk App
News | Mobile Devices | August 24, 2018
Cerner recently collaborated with Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) to develop an atherosclerotic cardiovascular...
Medisafe Demonstrates Double-Digit Impact on Hypertension Medication Adherence
News | Mobile Devices | June 13, 2018
Medication management platform Medisafe released data showing that, on average, hypertensive patients increase their...
Videos | Mobile Devices | February 16, 2018
DAIC Editor Dave Fornell previews the launch of augmented reality (AR) technology in the March/April 2018 issue of DA
Nine in Ten Clinicians to Use Mobile Technology at Bedside by 2022
News | Mobile Devices | January 31, 2018
Zebra Technologies Corp. announced the results of its Future of Healthcare: 2022 Hospital Vision Study, revealing the...
European Heart Rhythm Association Launches Cardiac Arrest First Responder App
News | Mobile Devices | June 30, 2017
A novel smartphone application has been developed that can direct first responders to cardiac arrest victims more than...
Consumers Warned About Accuracy of Heart Rate Apps in New Study
News | Mobile Devices | May 22, 2017
May 22, 2017 — Consumers are being warned about the accuracy of heart rate apps after a study found huge variability
Spok Survey Confirms Mobile Device Infrastructure Improvements and Diversity in Hospitals
News | Mobile Devices | May 03, 2017
Spok Inc. recently released the second part of the company's annual mobility in healthcare survey. Spok has been...
Xcertia, new alliance, guidelines, mobile health applications
News | Mobile Devices | January 12, 2017
Four organizations have announced they are forming a new, multi-stakeholder collaboration, Xcertia, dedicated to...
smartphones, hospital tranfers, heart attack patients, JACC study, South Korea
News | Mobile Devices | September 23, 2016
Smartphone communication among medical teams at different hospitals can significantly reduce the time it takes for...
mobile health technology, mHealth, privacy and security, Computer magazine study
News | Mobile Devices | July 21, 2016
July 21, 2016 — A new paper published in the June issue of Computer cautions that while...
Overlay Init