News | April 08, 2009

Montana Clinic Tracks 3D Wall Motion with Toshiba’s Artida Ultrasound

April 8, 2009 - The Helena Cardiology Clinic of Helena, MT has installed two Toshiba Aplio Artida ultrasound systems with 3D Wall Motion Tracking capabilities, allowing sonographers and physicians to more quickly and accurately identify wall motion defects and the timing of cardiac events.

The feature is designed to greatly improve the detection of wall motion abnormalities in many cardiac disease states and cardiac resynchronization Therapy (CRT) and helps physicians optimize pacemaker settings.

“This advancement in imaging will enable me to better manage the care of my cardiac patients,” said Richard Paustian, M.D., owner of the Helena Cardiology Clinic. “In addition, these added clinical benefits enable us to expand our service offerings and provide a wider range of patients with advanced treatment.”

Using Artida’s real-time, multi-planar reformatting capabilities, physicians can reportedly assess global and regional LV function, including volumetric LV ejection fraction. Arbitrary views of the heart, not available in 2D imaging, are also obtained to help with surgical planning. The 3D Wall Motion Tracking features allow the user to obtain angle-independent, global and regional information about myocardial contraction. It is hoped these features will enable acquisition of additional data that could be of value in echo-guided CRT and in stress echocardiography.

For more information: www.medical.toshiba.com.

Related Content

New Multimodality Cardiac Imaging Guidelines for Competitive Athletes Created. ASE SCCT and SCMR recommendations for imaging, screening atheletes.
News | Cardiac Imaging | May 11, 2020
May 11, 2020 – Competitive athletes are a rapidly growing population worldwide.
Figure 4 for the study. Images of a 65-year-old man (patient 6). (a) Cardiac MRI perfusion shows perfusion deficit of anterior/anterolateral wall attributed to left anterior descending artery/left circumflex artery (*). (b) CT coronary angiography. (c) Coronary angiography, left anterior oblique projection with caudal angulation. (d) Three-dimensional image fusion helped refine diagnosis: perfusion deficits (*) were most likely caused by narrow first diagonal branch and its first, stented side branch (arrow

Figure 4 for the study. Images of a 65-year-old man (patient 6). (a) Cardiac MRI perfusion shows perfusion deficit of anterior/anterolateral wall attributed to left anterior descending artery/left circumflex artery (*). (b) CT coronary angiography. (c) Coronary angiography, left anterior oblique projection with caudal angulation. (d) Three-dimensional image fusion helped refine diagnosis: perfusion deficits (*) were most likely caused by narrow first diagonal branch and its first, stented side branch (arrowhead). Retrospectively, denoted lesion could also be found at CT coronary angiography and coronary angiography (arrowheads in b and c, respectively). CT FFR = CT-derived fractional flow reserve, LGE = late gadolinium enhancement. Image courtesy of RSNA, Radiology.

News | Cardiac Imaging | May 04, 2020
May 4, 2020 – A new technique that combines computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging MRI can bolster c
An example of a coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) exam. The CIAO study looked at patients who have a problem of blood flow limitation and chest pain symptoms in the absence of a 50 percent or more artery narrowing, known as ischemia with no obstructive CAD, or INOCA.

An example of a coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) exam. The CIAO study looked at patients who have a problem of blood flow limitation and chest pain symptoms in the absence of a 50 percent or more artery narrowing, known as ischemia with no obstructive CAD, or INOCA.

News | Cardiac Imaging | April 03, 2020
April 3, 2020 — Patients who experience chest pain and have abnormal results on a cardiac stress test but who do not
Schematic depiction of the automated process for assessing fat, muscle, liver, aortic calcification, and bone from original abdominal CT scan data

Figure 1: Depiction of the fully automated CT biomarkers tools used in this study. (A) Schematic depiction of the automated process for assessing fat, muscle, liver, aortic calcification, and bone from original abdominal CT scan data. (B) Case example in an asymptomatic 52-year-old man undergoing CT for colorectal cancer screening. At the time of CT screening, he had a body-mass index of 27·3 and Framingham risk score of 5% (low risk). However, several CT-based metabolic markers were indicative of underlying disease. Multivariate Cox model prediction based on these three CT-based results put the risk of cardiovascular event at 19% within 2 years, at 40% within 5 years, and at 67% within 10 years, and the risk of death at 4% within 2 years, 11% within 5 years, and 27% within 10 years. At longitudinal clinical follow-up, the patient suffered an acute myocardial infarction 3 years after this initial CT and died 12 years after CT at the age of 64 years. (C) Contrast-enhanced CT performed 7 months before death for minor trauma was interpreted as negative but does show significant progression of vascular calcification, visceral fat, and hepatic steatosis. HU=Hounsfield units.

News | Cardiac Imaging | March 06, 2020
March 6, 2020 — Researchers at the National Institutes of Health a
ASNC Announces Multisocietal Cardiac Amyloidosis Imaging Consensus
News | Cardiac Imaging | September 09, 2019
The American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) published a new expert consensus document along with eight other...
Philips Debuts Cardiac Ultrasound and Enterprise Informatics Offerings at ESC 2019
News | Cardiac Imaging | August 30, 2019
Philips will showcase its latest cardiac care innovations at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2019,...
A high-fidelity 3-D tractography of the left ventricle heart muscle fibers of a mouse

Figure 1. A high-fidelity 3-D tractography of the left ventricle heart muscle fibers of a mouse from Amsterdam Ph.D. researcher Gustav Strijkers.

News | Cardiac Imaging | June 07, 2019
The Amsterdam University Medical Center has won MR Solutions’ Image of the Year 2019 award for the best molecular...