News | September 24, 2013

SERVE-HF, the World’s Largest Study of Sleep-Disordered Breathing in Heart Failure, Completes Recruitment

Results, expected in 2016, set to demonstrate the impact of effective treatment of central sleep apnea on morbidity and mortality in a heart failure population

September 24, 2013 – ResMed announced at the ESC Congress 2013 that SERVE-HF has completed enrollment. SERVE-HF is an international, randomised study of 1,325 participants investigating if the treatment of central sleep-disordered breathing (central sleep apnea) improves survival and outcomes of patients with stable heart failure.

Approximately 14 million people in Europe are living with heart failure and central sleep-disordered breathing is known to be a highly prevalent co-morbidity in these patients. With an estimated 30-50 percent of heart failure patients potentially at risk from this condition, the results from SERVE-HF may have important consequences for the future management of these patients.

“Completing recruitment of SERVE-HF has been an important milestone in this landmark trial,” said co-principal investigator, Professor Martin Cowie of the Royal Brompton Hospital in London. “We owe much to the commitment and dedication of SERVE-HF investigators and to a strong collaboration between sleep specialists and cardiologists. We now look forward to results in 2016 and to a fuller understanding of just how important the treatment of central sleep-disordered breathing is in heart failure patients.”

SERVE-HF will, for the first time, provide conclusive evidence of the health impact of effectively treating heart failure patients who have central sleep-disordered breathing. The trial, which began in 2008, is sponsored by ResMed. Designed as an event-driven study, its completion is anticipated by mid-2015 and results are expected to be available in the first half of 2016.

For more information on ResMed, visit www.resmed.com

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