News | Womens Cardiovascular Health | January 11, 2019

Sex Differences in 'Body Clock' May Benefit Women’s Heart Health

Study finds female mice still regulate blood pressure properly, even with lack of a circadian clock gene

Sex Differences in 'Body Clock' May Benefit Women’s Heart Health

January 11, 2019 — Research suggests that a gene that governs the body’s biological (circadian) clock acts differently in males versus females and may protect females from heart disease. The study is the first to analyze circadian blood pressure rhythms in female mice. The research was published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology — Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

The body’s circadian clock — the biological clock that organizes bodily activities over a 24-hour period — contributes to normal variations in blood pressure and heart function over the course of the day. In most healthy humans, blood pressure dips at night. People who do not experience this temporary drop, called “non-dippers,” are more likely to develop heart disease. The circadian clock is made up of four main proteins (encoded by “clock genes”) that regulate close to half of all genes in the body, including those important for blood pressure regulation.

Previous research has shown that male mice that are missing one of the four clock genes (PER1) become non-dippers and have a higher risk for heart and kidney disease. A research team studied the circadian response and blood pressure of female mice that lack PER1 and compared them with a healthy female control group. On both low- and high-salt diets, both groups “retained an apparent circadian rhythm” of blood pressure, the researchers explained. Unlike the male mice in previous research, the females without PER1 showed normal dips in blood pressure overnight.

These results suggest that the lack of PER1 acts differently in males and females. The findings are consistent with research showing that premenopausal women are less likely to be non-dippers than men of the same age. “This study represents an important step in understanding sex differences in the regulation of cardiovascular function by the circadian clock,” the researchers wrote.

For more information: www.physiology.org

 

Reference

1. Douma L.G., Solocinski K., Holzworth M.R., et al. Female C57BL/6J mice lacking the circadian clock protein PER1 are protected from non-dipping hypertension. American Journal of Physiology — Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, Jan. 7, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpregu.00381.2017

Related Content

With the advent and optimization of nuclear scintigraphy protocols using bone-avid radiotracers, cardiac amyloidosis caused by transthyretin protein (ATTR) can now be diagnosed noninvasively without a costly tissue biopsy. The radiotracer 99mTc-pyrophosphate (99mTc-PYP) binds to deposited ATTR amyloid fibrils in the myocardium and can be visualized using planar and SPECT imaging. Amyloidosis Patient Registry  #Amyloidosis

With the advent and optimization of nuclear scintigraphy protocols using bone-avid radiotracers, cardiac amyloidosis caused by transthyretin protein (ATTR) can now be diagnosed noninvasively without a tissue biopsy. The radiotracer 99mTc-pyrophosphate (99mTc-PYP) binds to deposited ATTR amyloid fibrils in the myocardium and can be visualized using planar and SPECT imaging. This is Figure 2, showing how SPECT imaging allows the reader to distinguish between blood pool activity (ventricular cavity, etc) and myocardial activity and identify regional myocardial differences in radiotracer uptake.

News | Cardiac Diagnostics | March 05, 2020
March 5, 2020 — More than 300 patients have joined the Amyloidosis Patient Registry and it is now available to the en
heart disease image
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | December 18, 2019
December 18, 2019 — In their latest report, “...
FDA Warns Troponin Tests Impacted by Biotin Dietary Supplement
Feature | Cardiac Diagnostics | November 05, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor
November 5, 2019 — The U.S.
Videos | Cardiac Diagnostics | October 29, 2019
Doctor Clyde Yancy was a keynote speaker and said doctors need to check their assumptions about patients at the door...
79-year-old Tony Marovic had a right carotid endarterectomy shortly after discovering a 95 percent blockage of his carotid artery at a health and wellness screening event

79-year-old Tony Marovic had a right carotid endarterectomy shortly after discovering a 95 percent blockage of his carotid artery at a health and wellness screening event. Image courtesy of University Hospitals.

News | Cardiac Diagnostics | October 16, 2019
Health and wellness screenings are more than just nice events for the community – they can save lives. A Mentor, Ohio,...
Pesticide Exposure May Increase Heart Disease and Stroke Risk

Image courtesy of zefe wu from Pixabay

News | Cardiac Diagnostics | October 15, 2019
On-the-job exposure to high levels of pesticides raised the risk of heart disease and stroke in a generally healthy...
World Heart Federation Launches Global Roadmap on Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Among Diabetics
News | Cardiac Diagnostics | September 04, 2019
At the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2019 together with the World Congress of Cardiology, the World...
Insomnia Tied to Higher Risk of Heart Disease and Stroke

Image courtesy of the American Heart Association

News | Cardiac Diagnostics | August 19, 2019
People suffering from insomnia may have an increased risk of coronary artery disease, heart failure and stroke,...