News | December 01, 2009

SNM’s Conjoint Mid-Winter Meetings Offer Four Scientific Meetings in One Location

November 23, 2009 — SNM will hold its Conjoint Mid-Winter Meetings on Jan. 27-Feb. 2, 2010, at the Albuquerque Convention Center in Albuquerque, N.M.

This year, SNM joins its annual Mid-Winter Educational Symposium with the 2010 Annual Meeting and Educational Symposium of the American College of Nuclear Medicine (ACNM), the Nanomedicine and Molecular Imaging Summit and the Clinical Trials Network Community Workshop. The seven-day event offers participants a wide range of scientific content that covers nuclear medicine, molecular imaging, nanomedicine and clinical trials.

“The mid-winter meeting has grown to include more exceptional educational and scientific content,” said Michael M. Graham, Ph.D., M.D., president of SNM. “Attendees will find that they have more opportunities than ever before to earn educational credit, network with colleagues and learn from the top educators and innovators in the field.”

Leading molecular imaging and nuclear medicine physicians and scientists, radiologists, cardiologists, radiopharmacists and technologists representing the world’s top medical and academic institutions and centers will lead sessions. Attendees will have the opportunity to earn up to 25 continuing education credits.

The ACNM Annual Meeting and Educational Symposium, which begins on Jan. 27, will feature lectures about the use of PET/CT in the brain and neck, genitourinary system, head and neck cancer and thyroid cancer.

SNM’s Mid-Winter Educational Symposium, which begins on Jan. 30, will include numerous educational sessions, including the popular CT Case Review sessions, which include 100 cases and 16 credits. In a session titled, “The Sharp Edges of Nuclear Medicine: See What’s New,” technologists will be introduced to the newest techniques in fusion imaging and imaging with a focus on patients with epilepsy.

Peter Herscovitch, M.D., chair of SNM’s Scientific Program Committee, said, “We are very pleased about the quality of this year’s educational program, which offers top-notch scientific content from some of the leaders in the field of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging.”

SNM’s Nanomedicine and Molecular Imaging Summit, which takes place Jan. 31–Feb. 1, will provide a thought-provoking setting in which to examine key issues related to the rapid growth and evolving science of nanomedicine. The summit will delve into the cutting-edge field of nanotechnology, offering five sessions, followed by a roundtable and panel discussions.

The SNM Clinical Trials Network Community Workshop will provide hands-on training to physicians and technologists through the clinical research imaging technologist certification curriculum; multi-site imaging challenges for investigational therapeutics clinical trials; site qualification via the SNM Clinical Trials Network phantom program; multicenter clinical trials production; and site inspections.

“With expanded offerings and more days to fit in activities, SNM’s Conjoint Mid-Winter Meetings will certainly be a fulfilling event for all who attend,” said Graham.

For more information: www.snm.org/mwm.

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