Webinar | July 19, 2016

Webinar: Exploring the Prevalence of Motion Artifacts in Clinical MRI and Possible Solution Strategies

This webinar is part of the DAIC Webinar Series and is supported by an educational grant from Philips Healthcare

This webinar explains the prevalence of MRI motion artifacts, outline the related financial and time burdens associated with patient motion and summarize solutions. The speaker is Jalal Andre, M.D., director of neurological MRI, radiology, at Harborview Medical Center and an assistant professor at the University of Washington, Seattle. 


The webinar took place July 27, 2016.


Register for the archive version of this webinar


 


Statement of Purpose/Need:


This webinar will explain the prevalence of MRI motion artifacts, outline the related financial and time burdens associated with patient motion and summarize solutions. 

 


Learning Objectives:


Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to:


• Describe the prevalence of motion artifacts in a clinical population that can vary based on patient disposition and scanner parameters.

• Identify the financial and temporal opportunity costs associated with patient motion.

• Outline possible solution strategies to mitigate patient motion during clinical MRI scanning.


 


Intended Audience:


This webinar is intended for radiologists and MRI technologists.

 


Presenters:


Jalal B. Andre, M.D.

Assistant Professor, Radiology

University of Washington

Director of Neurological MRI, Radiology

Harborview Medical Center

Seattle, WA


Andre is director of neurological MRI and is the MRI safety officer at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. He also serves as an assistant professor of radiology, with expertise in neuroradiology, at the University of Washington. His research interests include the clinical application of advanced MRI techniques in assessing brain vessel abnormalities and traumatic brain injury. Specifically, Andre’s focus involves measuring brain perfusion using arterial spin labeling, an MRI technique that can non-invasively measure blood delivery to the brain and requires no IV contrast. He is also involved in on-going clinical research using this technique to better understand vasospasm, a type of temporary vessel narrowing that can occur in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. The technique is also being explored to evaluate sports-related traumatic brain injury in adolescents.


 


Disclosure Information:


Jalal B. Andre, M.D.

Assistant Professor, Radiology

University of Washington

Director of Neurological MRI, Radiology

Harborview Medical Center

Seattle, Wash.


Financial relationships:

None


Discussion of off-label, investigational or experimental drugs/devices use:

Prospective optimized tracking devices


 


Register for the archive version of this webinar


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