Technology | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 12, 2018

FDA Clears Canon Medical Systems’ New Vantage Galan 3.0T XGO Edition MRI

System equipped with new Saturn X gradient for expanded cardiac MR capabilities 

The FDA has cleared the Toshiba Vantage Galan 3.0T XGO Edition MRI from Canon Medical Systems.

February 12, 2018 — Physicians now have access to more neuro and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) capabilities with the Vantage Galan 3.0T XGO Edition from Canon Medical Systems USA, Inc. Outfitted with the all-new Saturn X Gradient, the system can provide up to 30 percent improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for brain diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), resulting in even higher resolution neuro images than previously offered. The newly FDA-cleared system enables sequences for quantitative analysis and allows cardiac exams to be completed with fewer breath holds and improved patient comfort.

The Galan 3T XGO Edition offers the ability to conduct quick, comfortable and high-quality neuro imaging exams, and allows for faster sampling and higher-resolution images, thanks to PURERF and Saturn technologies. This, combined with the ability to stack protocol sequences, results in quick neuro exams, enabling healthcare providers to produce higher resolution images for myriad neuro exams in under five minutes. Initial indications suggest the following neuro sequences can be performed in under five minutes: SAG T1, AX T2, AX T2 FLAIR, AX T2 and AX DWI/ADC. New software that comes with the system also offers MultiBand SPEEDER technology, which allows for multiple slices to be acquired at the same time, reducing diffusion weighted imaging scan times by up to two times.

The Galan 3T XGO Edition also delivers enhanced cardiac capabilities, including T1 mapping that utilizes Modified Look-Locker Inversion recovery (MOLLI) sequence and allows providers to acquire a more quantitative characterization of myocardial tissue within a single breath hold. The system’s Phase Sensitive Inversion Recovery (PSIR) in the heart provides improved contrast in late-enhanced imaging and eliminates the need for inversion time (TI) calibration scan, allowing cardiac exams to be completed with fewer breath holds and greater patient comfort.

“The new Galan 3T XGO Edition with Saturn X Gradient builds on the strengths of its predecessor and expands the versatility of MR even further with faster and higher resolution images, so that physicians don’t have to sacrifice accuracy or patient comfort for speed,” said Dominic Smith, senior director, CT, PET/CT, and MR business units, Canon Medical Systems USA. “With the help of this new advanced gradient and imaging package, health care providers can better meet their patients’ diverse needs, while continuing to provide a quiet and comfortable experience.”

For more information: us.medical.canon

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