Technology | October 29, 2013

Nonin Medical Announces FDA Clearance of Nonin Bluetooth Smart Model 3230 Finger Pulse Oximeter

Model 3230 is one of the first medical devices to incorporate bluetooth low energy wireless technology

patient monitors pulse oximeters nonin model 3230 bluetooth
October 29, 2013 — Nonin Medical Inc., the inventor of finger pulse oximetry and a leader in noninvasive medical monitoring, announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has cleared the Nonin Model 3230 Bluetooth Smart finger pulse oximeter for use in the United States. The Model 3230 is one of the first medical devices to incorporate Bluetooth Smart (low energy) wireless technology. 
 
Bluetooth Smart helps to facilitate simple and secure connections to Bluetooth Smart-ready devices for vital information exchange over a secure wireless connection. Nonin demonstrated the device at the Connected Health Symposium 2013.
 
The company designed the Model for use in a variety of telehealth installations for patients who rely on accurate SpO2 and pulse rate readings, especially patients who live with chronic diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), congestive heart failure (CHF) and asthma.
 
The Model 3230 features Nonin's exclusive CorrectCheck technology, which provides feedback via a digital display if the patient's finger is not placed correctly in the device. CorrectCheck is helpful since improper finger placement may lead to incorrect readings.
Another innovative feature is SmartPoint capture, an algorithm that automatically determines when a high-quality measurement is ready to be wirelessly transmitted. This helps to ensure that each reading transmitted by the Model 3230 is accurate.
 
For more information: www.nonin.com
 

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