Feature | May 31, 2013

ASE Defines Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Practice Standards

May 31, 2013 — The American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) released a new expert consensus statement this week focusing on the practice of using ultrasound as a tool for improving patient physical examinations. “Focused Cardiac Ultrasound: Recommendations from the American Society of Echocardiography” will appear in the June issue of the Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography (JASE).  

The recent improvements in portability of cardiovascular ultrasound equipment have had a significant impact on its use in medical practice. As such, this new recommendation aims to inform the medical community and define how focused cardiac ultrasound (FCU) can be used to positively impact patient care. Technological advances have resulted in a growth in cardiac ultrasound images being procured by a variety of specialists and generalists in a range of settings, such as outpatient clinics, inpatient wards, critical care units, emergency departments and remote clinics. With the creation and publication of these recommendations, ASE is identifying how practitioners with limited training can appropriately use portable devices to expedite and improve the quality of patient care.  

“The development of small, inexpensive, portable ultrasound devices, combined with a growing interest of physicians in many specialties to use ultrasound at the bedside for point-of-care assessment, prompted the American Society of Echocardiography to develop this expert consensus document,” said Patricia Pellikka, M.D., FASE, a cardiologist at Mayo Clinic and president of ASE. “This document establishes definitions for focused cardiac ultrasound, describes its appropriate application and discusses issues of training for the user. It will be a valuable reference for ASE members and for the medical community at large.”

This document will change practice for clinicians by encouraging additional training in light of the significant role the comprehensive transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) has in the proper care and treatment of the heart patient. Key information obtained during the TTE is crucial in initiating proper therapies and in the evaluation of abnormalities. FCU is a focused examination of the cardiovascular system performed by a physician using ultrasound as an adjunct to the physical examination to recognize specific ultrasonic signs that represent a narrow list of potential diagnoses in specific clinical settings. The document distinguishes the emerging field of FCU as a bedside adjunct to the physical examination and echocardiography.  Defining the distinctions between these techniques will allow practitioners to realize the utility of FCU while maintaining the value of echocardiography.

“Recent advances have resulted in the development of small platforms which have brought the power of ultrasound to the bedside,” said Kirk T. Spencer, M.D., FASE, cardiologist at the University of Chicago and ASE’s Guidelines and Standards Committee chairman, who served as the lead author of the guideline. “Physicians from diverse specialties, who have less training in cardiac image acquisition and interpretation compared to those trained in echocardiography, can learn to acquire and interpret cardiac ultrasound images as an adjunct to their physical examination assessment in clinical settings relevant to their scope of practice.”

For more information: www.onlinejase.com, www.asecho.org/guidelines

Related Content

Alpha Source, data study, ultrasound equipment, total cost of ownership
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound| February 01, 2016
Alpha Source, a Milwaukee-based provider of healthcare technology management solutions, announced the publication of a...
AMA, investigational CPT code, myocardial strain imaging, cardio-oncology
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound| January 27, 2016
Effective Jan. 1, 2016, the American Medical Association (AMA) Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) Editorial Panel...
Technology | Ultrasound Intra-cardiac Echo (ICE)| January 26, 2016
Conavi Medical Inc. (formerly Colibri Technologies Inc.) has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k)...
Fujifilm, SonoSite Edge II, portable ultrasound system, FDA and CE clearance
Technology | Ultrasound Imaging| January 26, 2016
January 26, 2016 — Fujifilm SonoSite Inc. announced CE mark and U.S.
Sponsored Content | Case Study | Cardiovascular Ultrasound| January 21, 2016
This case study is from the Cardiac Imaging Department, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona, Spain.
Csound, GE ultrasound

4D Clarity, HDlive and cSound acquisition provide excellent TTE and TEE images.

Sponsored Content | Case Study | January 21, 2016
GE Healthcare is taking the next leap in image quality performance, quantification and workflow with the introduction
Cath lab radiation dose reduaction, doseaware, raysafe

The Philips DoseAware Xtend system is an advanced version of the Unfors RaySafe system, combining real time radiation detection badges and a live video screen showing each person in the cath lab in a different color. The system reports their real-time exposure rate and cumulative dose since the start of a procedure. It shows changes in dose exposure the closer a person gets to the C-arm.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging| January 12, 2016 | Dave Fornell
Each year radiology vendors use the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting as a springboard to unveil t
Fujifilm VisualSonics, Vevo MD, UHF, ultra-high frequency ultrasound, CE Mark
Technology | Cardiovascular Ultrasound| January 11, 2016
Fujifilm VisualSonics Inc. announced CE mark for the Vevo MD, what the company calls the world’s first ultra-high...
ASE, guidelines, echocardiography, cardiac sources of stroke, embolism
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound| January 07, 2016
Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the Western industrialized world, and according to the Centers for...
Technology | Cardiovascular Ultrasound| December 30, 2015
Hitachi Aloka Medical America is proud to partner with AccreditCoach to provide customers assistance with accreditation...
Overlay Init