Feature | September 10, 2012

Baylor Researchers Begin Study of Link Between A-Fib and Cardiac Surgery

September 10, 2012 — Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common complication of cardiac surgery, occurring in 10 to 40 percent of patients. Recent studies show it to be associated with poorer health following surgery and poorer long-term survival. Furthermore, development of AF after cardiac surgery leads to average additional healthcare costs of $15,000 to $20,000.

As part of an ongoing NIH National Heart Lung and Blood Institute study, Giovanni Filardo, Ph.D., MPH, and his team are executing a large national multicenter study assessing the effectiveness of optimal preventive and management strategies (based on American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology/European Society of Cardiology [AHA/ACC/ESC] and AACP guidelines) and their impact on the incidence of post-CABG (coronary artery bypass graft surgery) AF and long-term survival. Filardo is director of epidemiology at Baylor Health Care System’s Institute for Health Care Research and Improvement, and The Bradley Family Endowed Chair in cardiovascular epidemiology at Baylor University Medical Center.

"Currently we do not know what causes post-operative AF, nor how to identify patients at high risk and effectively prevent or mitigate this complication," said Filardo. "These are the questions that the study seeks to answer."

The retrospective study will look at patients who underwent isolated CABG surgery at Baylor University Medical Center (Dallas), Baylor Heart Hospital (Plano, Texas), Emory University (Atlanta), University of Virginia (Charlottesville, Va.) or Washington University (St. Louis). The study will provide insights into the prevention and management of post-operative AF, allowing healthcare providers to improve survival and decrease costs of care associated with CABG surgery.

More than 100,000 people in the United States and 1.5 million people worldwide undergo isolated CABG surgery each year. "Even taking the conservative estimate of 20 percent of those patients developing AF, the results of this study stand to improve survival for 300,000 people and save as much as $6 billion ($20,000 per person cost attributable to post-operative AF) in healthcare costs each year," said Filardo.

The purpose of the study is to identify the causes of new-onset AF in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, and whether current guidelines for high-risk patients are effective in preventing new-onset AF or if treatment protocols for those patients who do experience the condition are effective in improving survival. The study will be completed in April 2014.

For more information: www.baylorhealth.edu/research

Related Content

St. Jude Medical, ADO II AS trial, congenital heart disease, PDA, Amplatzer Duct Occluder II AS
News | Congenital Heart| October 19, 2016
St. Jude Medical Inc. announced the launch of the ADO II AS (AMPLATZER Duct Occluder II Additional Sizes) pediatric...
Inventory management, Cardinal, RFID inventory tracking, cath lab inventory
Sponsored Content | Whitepapers | Inventory Management| October 18, 2016
As healthcare moves into the era of bundled payments, providers need to be especially focused on ensuring delivery of
Lantheus, flurpiridaz F-18, myocardial perfusion imaging, MPI, cardiac stress testing, ASNC 2016
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers| October 17, 2016
Lantheus Holdings Inc. announced in late September that sub-analysis data from the first Phase 3 study of flurpiridaz F...
Medtronic, FIRE AND ICE trial, Arctic Front, cryoballoon catheter ablation, radiofrequency RF ablation, study results, Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society Scientific Sessions
News | Ablation Systems| October 17, 2016
Medtronic plc last week unveiled new health economic analysis data from the FIRE AND ICE trial that favor cryoballoon...
CDC warning, LivaNova Stockert 3T heater-cooler devices, open-heart surgery patients
News | Cardiovascular Surgery| October 14, 2016
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is warning healthcare providers and patients about the potential...
Medtronic, FDA approval, MRI, MR-conditional scanning, cardiac devices
Technology | EP Lab| October 13, 2016
Medtronic plc is the first company to receive U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for its suite of cardiac...
transcarotid artery revascularization, TCAR Surveillance Project, Society for Vascular Surgery Patient Safety Organization, SVS PSO,
News | Stents Carotid| October 13, 2016
A surveillance project to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of transcarotid artery revascularization (TCAR) in...
SentreHeart, Eclipse Surgical Device, left atrial appendage, LAA closure, first clinical use, Poland
News | Left Atrial Appendage (LAA) Occluders| October 13, 2016
SentreHeart Inc. announced this week it has treated the first patients using the Eclipse Surgical Device, which is...
3-D bioprinting, 3-D printing, printed organs, 3D bioprinting

3-D printed vessel made from living cells implanted in an animal to test feasibility of using such structures clinically. Blood vessels are a stepping stone to the creation of more complex 3-D printed organs made from biomaterials. Image from the South Carolina Project for Organ Biofabrication.


Feature | 3-D Printing| October 13, 2016 | Dave Fornell
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) changed its rules concerning custom medical devices Oct.
Overlay Init