Feature | May 23, 2011

Cost Effectiveness Study Determines FFR Can Improve Health While Reducing Costs

May 23, 2011 – An analysis of the benefits to using a fractional flow reserve (FFR)-guided intervention strategy found that the technology can improve patient outcomes while saving significant amounts of money. Full results for the U.K., France and Italy and preliminary results in Switzerland and Belgium were announced at a late breaking trial session last week at EuroPCR.

The analysis, which was funded by an educational research grant from St. Jude Medical, found that within each of the country’s respective health care systems, the FFR-guided approach is cost-saving, meaning that use of FFR improves health outcomes for patients with multivessel coronary artery disease at lower costs when compared to using angiography alone.

The magnitude of health and budget impact strongly depends on assumptions about the cost of cardiovascular care in each country and local clinical conditions. Additionally, in each country, the use of the PressureWire technology improved the quality-adjusted life expectancy for PCI patients.

“In each region where this economic analysis was conducted, the PressureWire was found to both improve clinical outcomes by increasing quality-adjusted life years and reducing the number of cardiac events and save a substantial amount of resources,” said Professor Uwe Siebert, M.D., M.Sc., MPH., Sc.D., from the Health and Life Sciences University of Hall (Austria), who led the research project. “Our research reveals that the magnitude of the health benefits and cost savings from FFR measurement for the European patients and health care payers could be even more significant under an optimal FFR implementation scenario.”

Specifically, in the context of the current healthcare model for each respective country, the analysis found:

In the United Kingdom FFR use:

• Can prevent on average more than 30 avoidable deaths, more than 70 heart attacks and more than 120 major adverse cardiac events (MACE) over two years
• Could save the British healthcare system more than 300,000 euro in 2011 and more than 800,000 euro in 2012
• Potentially reduces treatment cost for PCI per patient by an average of about 600 euro in the U.K.

In France FFR use:

• Can prevent on average nearly 300 avoidable deaths, nearly 700 heart attacks and about 1,200 MACE in France over two years
• Could save the French healthcare system more than 5 million euro in 2011 and more than 11 million euro in 2012
• Potentially reduces treatment cost for PCI per patient by an average of about 900 eEuro in France

In Italy FFR use:

• Can prevent on average more than 120 avoidable deaths, more than 300 heart attacks and more than 520 MACE in Italy over two years
• Could save the Italian healthcare system more than 800,000 euro in 2011 and more than 3 million euro in 2012
• Potentially reduces treatment cost for PCI per patient by an average of about 500 euro in Italy

The study was conducted to determine the incremental cost-effectiveness of FFR-guided vs. angiography-guided PCI in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease in the various health care systems in question from the societal perspective. To do this, original patient-level data from the landmark FAME (Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) vs. Angiography in Multivessel Evaluation) study were used.

“Results in both the U.S. and now in Europe have demonstrated that FFR both improves patient outcomes and reduces cost to the healthcare system. With healthcare system finances under pressure everywhere, we are proud to offer a technology that relieves European health care systems from financial pressure and that protects and saves the lives of European patients,” said Frank J. Callaghan, president of the St. Jude Medical Cardiovascular Division.

The methodology of the data analysis in each country was verified by local physicians.

Preliminary results in Belgium and Switzerland also reveal a trend towards cost-savings. The full report for these countries will be revealed later this year.

FFR measurements indicate the severity of blood flow blockages in the coronary arteries. Using the PressureWire Aeris or PressureWire Certus, this physiological measurement helps physicians to better identify which specific lesion or lesions are responsible for a patient’s ischemia, a deficiency of blood supply to the heart caused by blood restriction. The benefits of FFR were recognized in the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS) Guidelines with new recommendations for the treatment of coronary artery disease which support measuring FFR in a wide range of patients before performing PCI or recommending surgery.

For more information: www.sjm.com

Related Content

ICDs, non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, University of Alabama at Birmingham study, Circulation
News | Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators (ICD)| January 18, 2017
A new study published in Circulation has found there is a 23 percent risk in reduction of all-cause mortality in non-...
stress, brain activity, cardiovascular risk, PET-CT, MGH, ISSMS, The Lancet study
News | Cardiac Diagnostics| January 18, 2017
A study led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISSMS) investigators...
ICDs, implantable cardioverter defibrillators, survival rate, elderly patients, JACC study
News | Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators (ICD)| January 17, 2017
Of patients over age 65 who received an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) after surviving sudden cardiac...
University of Utah, Frank Sachse, heart failure, LVAD implantation, left ventricular assist device, biomarker, t-system

Two patients may seem equally sick based upon clinical measures, but differences in their heart physiology could predict who has the potential to recover from heart failure. A study carried out by scientists at the University of Utah finds that patients whose hearts have flattened t-tubules have a decreased chance of showing signs of recovery after implanting a mechanical heart pump. Ordinarily, t-tubules in the heart are long, thin, and rounded. Image courtesy of Frank Sachse.

News | Cardiac Diagnostics| January 17, 2017
Investigators at the University of Utah have identified distinct differences in the hearts of advanced heart failure...
Synergy stent, abluminal polymer DES, bioresorbable polymer DES, bioresorbable polymer metallic stent

The Synergy stent is the first FDA cleared drug-eluting stent to use a bioresorbable polymer drug carrier. When the polymer dissolves after about four months, the devices become a bare metal stent. The technology is supposed to reduce the rate of late stent thrombosis due to vessel inflammation caused by durable polymers.

Feature | Stents Bioresorbable| January 17, 2017 | Dave Fornell
One of the big advancements in drug-eluting stent (DES) technology has been the development of bioresorbable polymers
St. Jude Medical, Amplatzer Amulet LAA Occluder, observational study, TCT 2016
News | Left Atrial Appendage (LAA) Occluders| November 03, 2016
St. Jude Medical Inc. presented favorable results from the largest observational study to date of the company’s...
Medtronic, CoreValve Evolut R TAVR system, U.S. IDE Study, TCT 2016
News | Heart Valve Technology| November 03, 2016
Medtronic plc unveiled new clinical data showing that patients treated with the self-expanding CoreValve Evolut R...
open-heart surgery, PCI, percutaneous coronary intervention, NOBLE trial, left main coronary artery disease, LMCAD, TCT 2016
News | Cardiovascular Surgery| November 03, 2016
Coronary artery bypass (CABG) surgery is the standard treatment for revascularization in patients with left main...
News | Drug-Eluting Balloons| November 03, 2016
The Spectranetics Corp. announced that it has submitted to the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) its Pre-Market...
Medtronic, Resolute Integrity DES, drug-eluting stent, BIO-RESORT study, TCT 2016
News | Stents Drug Eluting| November 02, 2016
Investigators recently unveiled clinical data from the independent BIO-RESORT study, representing the first all-comers...
Overlay Init