Feature | November 12, 2013

Fujifilm Selected for NASA In-Flight and Ground-Based Clinical Care Operations

pacs cardiac NASA fujifilm wyle
November 12, 2013 — Personnel of Wyle, a provider of engineering, scientific and technical service to the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), at the Johnson Space Center have selected Fujifilm Medical Systems U.S.A. Inc. to implement Synapse Radiology and Synapse Cardiovascular to support NASA’s in-flight as well as ground-based clinical care operations.
“Wyle needed an extensible and scalable solution which could capture and store diagnostic imaging data and reports from all of its modalities, integrate with its existing EMR and other health information systems, and provide secure remote access to its flight surgeons from any location,” said Byron Smith, medical systems engineer, Wyle’s Science, technology and engineering group. “After a thorough review of the market, Wyle ultimately decided on Fujifilm’s Synapse Enterprise PACS because it was the most comprehensive Web-based diagnostic image data management solution available that could meet our needs. The integration among the tools streamlines workflows and provides sophisticated methodologies to analyze findings quickly and accurately.”
The integrated products will store and provide centralized access to all data collected from locations which support NASA Space Medicine’s clinical care operations including its Flight Medicine and Occupational Medicine Clinics; Clinical, Exercise and Research Laboratories; International Space Station (ISS) Mission Medical Support facilities and other external consultant and partner facilities.
For more information: www.fujimed.com

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