Feature | May 20, 2014

GE Healthcare Partners With Tesla Engineering to Produce Ultra High-Field 7T MRI Systems

May 20, 2014 — GE Healthcare and Tesla Engineering Ltd. are collaborating to produce 7T human whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners. The companies made the announcement at the joint meeting of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) and the European Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine and Biology (ESMRMB) in Milan.

Ultra high-field MRI systems are used for scientific and medical research, primarily for morphological and functional imaging of the brain while steadily expanding to all anatomies. Researchers using ultra high-field scanners hope their work will contribute to earlier disease detection, more accurate diagnosis and increased effectiveness of investigational therapies for disorders and diseases such as cancer, stroke, epilepsy, drug abuse, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, attention deficit disorder, multiple sclerosis, head injury, visual disorders and schizophrenia.

Tesla Engineering Ltd. is currently building a new factory in Storrington, U.K., to manufacture the 7 Tesla magnets. They have recruited several key engineering and management staff with extensive experience in the design and manufacturing of ultra high-field magnets. The first unit from the new production line is committed to GE and scheduled to ship in late 2015.

“This agreement will enable GE to deepen and broaden our collaborations with leading MRI academics and visionaries, sharing our collective expertise and missions in technology, science and medicine,” said Richard Hausmann, president and CEO of GE Healthcare, MR. “The GE 7T community in the U.S., Europe and Asia has already demonstrated breakthrough observations and understanding of Alzheimer’s disease, traumatic brain injury and cognitive physiology. Together, we will continue to push the frontiers of MRI for neuroscience and other applications.”

“Tesla is very pleased to collaborate with GE and to take a leadership position in the continuing evolution of MR magnet technology,” said Mike Begg, group managing director, Tesla Engineering Ltd. “This is a solid business opportunity for us that complements and builds upon our existing strengths in superconducting magnet technology, as well as our strong core technology positions in cryogenics.”

For more information: www.gehealthcare.com, www.tesla.co.uk

Related Content

CMS, Overall Hospital Quality Star Rating, national distribution, quailty of care
News | Business| July 26, 2016
July 25, 2016 — The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced that it expects to launch its new Over
Siemens Healthineers, Enterprise Services, ES, U.S. launch
Technology | Cardiac Imaging| July 19, 2016
July 19, 2016 — Siemens Healthineers recently introduced an expanded Services portfolio, known as Enterprise Services
Sponsored Content | Webinar | July 19, 2016
This webinar will explain the prevalence of MRI motion artifacts, outline the related financial and time burdens asso
gadolinium, ACR Manual on Contrast Media, update, FDA safety concerns
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)| July 12, 2016
The updated American College of Radiology (ACR) Manual on Contrast Media contains a statement addressing the U.S. Food...
MRI scanners, helium gas field discovery, Africa, future supply
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)| July 01, 2016
July 1, 2016 — Helium is essential for many modern technologies, including...
Vital Images, Vitrea 7 advanced visualization software, SCCT 2016
Technology | Advanced Visualization| June 30, 2016
Vital Images Inc. recently launched version 7 of its Vitrea advanced visualization software. This application-based...
DEFUSE-2 study, MRI, brain bleeding risk, post-stroke treatment, NIH

This image combines pre- and post-treatment scans from the same patient. Analysis of the two scans revealed that the area and size of post-treatment bleeding corresponded to blood-brain barrier disruption (shown in green, yellow and red) prior to therapy. Image courtesy of Richard Leigh, NINDS.

News | Stroke| June 29, 2016
In a study of stroke patients, investigators confirmed through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scans an...
BHF, Reflections of Research image competition, U.K., 4-D MRI, heart blood flow

This image shows blood flow within the main pumping chambers – the ventricles – on both sides of the heart and the vessels leaving the heart. The blue flow is blood that needs oxygen and is travelling to the lungs. The red flow is blood that has been through the lungs and received oxygen. Victoria Stoll of the University of Oxford is using this type of imaging to look at the blood flow within the hearts of people with heart failure, whose hearts are not pumping effectively.

News | Cardiac Imaging| June 24, 2016
The British Heart Foundation (BHF) announced the winners of its annual ‘Reflections of Research’ image competition,...
Biotronik, CardioStim 2016 Innovation Award, MRI AutoDetect, Ilivia ICDs
News | EP Lab| June 23, 2016
Biotronik announced it was the winner of the Cardiostim Innovation Award in the category “Best Practice Improvement”...
heart failure, muscle bleeding, British Cardiovascular Conference, MRI
News | Heart Failure| June 08, 2016
The amount a heart ‘bleeds’ following a heart attack can predict the severity of future heart failure, according to...
Overlay Init