Feature | July 19, 2013

Mount Sinai Medical Center First in New York to Offer HeartMate II Pocket Controller

July 19, 2013 — The Mount Sinai Medical Center is the first medical center in New York City to offer the HeartMate II pocket controller, newly approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), to help its advanced heart failure patients maintain more active lifestyles. This latest-generation controller for the HeartMate II left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is a new small, lightweight, patient-friendly external controller about the size of a smart phone that easily fits in a patient’s front pocket and powers their heart to pump.

“This new HeartMate II controller is a good step forward for our heart failure patients who are awaiting a heart transplant or in need of long-term, permanent support for their survival,” says Sean P. Pinney, M.D., director of the Advanced Heart Failure & Cardiac Transplantation Program at Mount Sinai. “With its smaller size and intuitive safety features, we expect the new controller will enhance the daily lives of our heart failure patients.”

Mount Sinai has one of the largest LVAD programs in the United States, with its cardiothoracic surgeons implanting approximately 50 each year. The center started using LVAD technology in 2006 for advanced heart failure patients. It is used as a bridge-to-transplant (BTT) therapy or destination therapy (DT) for permanent support. In addition, Mount Sinai performs dozens of successful heart transplants each year.

“This new controller will improve the LVAD patient’s overall experience [and] heighten the quality of their life by supporting their active lifestyle, while providing pocket-sized peace of mind for them and their clinical care team,” says Kimberly Ashley, FNP-BC, the VAD program manager for the Advanced Heart Failure & Cardiac Transplantation Program. “We hope to expand the use of this pocket-sized HeartMate II controller to not only new patients but also those current HeartMate II users to give them the option to swap out their old controller for the smaller, safer version, making their lives more comfortable and normal during their daily activities.”

The new patient-friendly controller is a small computer attached to the HeartMate II LVAD via one side cable. It enhances patients’ safety by powering their LVAD to pump their heart, monitoring their vital signs and alerting them of any concerns. Its new design features a diagnostic check system to make sure device wires are intact and functional, special visual alarms, precise onscreen instructions for the patient and longer backup battery power. In addition, the device is programmed with 37 languages to serve diverse patient populations.

“We do extensive patient education training before and after LVAD surgery to teach patients exactly how their controllers work, how to closely monitor their LVAD’s status and also to be vitally aware of any issues or concerns that may arise,” says Bess Griffin, RN, BSN, the VAD coordinator for the Advanced Heart Failure & Cardiac Transplantation Program. “The staff — who have begun training on the new, smart, smaller controller — really enjoy the device’s very easy, user-friendly interface. Thanks to the new controller we are expecting patients may be trained more quickly and feel more confident in caring for their device at home.”

The pocket controller is available for new advanced heart failure patients in need who receive HeartMate II, as well as for current HeartMate II patients who wish to upgrade their existing system controllers.

For more information: www.mountsinai.org

Related Content

sleep apnea, heart failure readmissions, Thomas Jefferson University study
News | Heart Failure| February 04, 2016
Early diagnosis and treatment of sleep apnea may reduce six-month readmissions for patients hospitalized with heart...
News | Heart Failure| February 04, 2016
New research from scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) published in the journal...
Technology | Information Technology| January 28, 2016
Boston Scientific Corp. and Accenture have developed a cloud-based, data-driven digital health solution for hospitals...
pulmonary artery to left atrial shunt, heart lung transplant, Oswaldo, Stanford Children's Health

2015 was a year of dramatic changes for Oswaldo and his family, seen here at his bedside, post-transplant surgery in July. Photo courtesy of Business Wire.

Feature | Cardiovascular Surgery| January 15, 2016
2016 is starting off a whole lot better than last year for 14-year-old Oswaldo Jimenez of Salem, Ore. Last year at this...
CardioKinetix, Parachute device, heart failure, PARACHUTE IV trial, half enrollment
News | Heart Failure| January 15, 2016
CardioKinetix Inc. announced that it has enrolled more than half of the subjects in its pivotal United States trial,...
News | Ventricular Assist Devices (VAD)| January 08, 2016
XENiOS announced that its i-COR Synchronized Cardiac Assist system protects left ventricular (LV) function compared to...
News | Stem Cell Therapies| January 07, 2016
January 7, 2016 — Celyad announced Dec. 21 that the U.S.
PPCM, peripartum cardiomyopathy, clinical study, titin protein, genetic mutation
News | Heart Failure| January 07, 2016
January 7, 2016 — Scientists have found that women who suffer unexplained...
heart failure, asynchrony, PITA, Johns Hopkins, pacemaker
News | EP Lab| January 04, 2016
Johns Hopkins has demonstrated in animals that applying a pacemaker’s mild electrical shocks to push the heart in and...
BioVentrix, Revivent-TC Ventricular Enhancement System, interventional heart failure

BioVentrix closed-chest Revivent-TC Ventricular Enhancement System reduces the size of the ventricle for more efficient pumping in heart failure patients.

News | Heart Failure| December 29, 2015
December 29, 2015 — BioVentrix in mid-December announced the successful completion of the 30th clinical case using th
Overlay Init