Feature | July 19, 2013

Mount Sinai Medical Center First in New York to Offer HeartMate II Pocket Controller

July 19, 2013 — The Mount Sinai Medical Center is the first medical center in New York City to offer the HeartMate II pocket controller, newly approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), to help its advanced heart failure patients maintain more active lifestyles. This latest-generation controller for the HeartMate II left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is a new small, lightweight, patient-friendly external controller about the size of a smart phone that easily fits in a patient’s front pocket and powers their heart to pump.

“This new HeartMate II controller is a good step forward for our heart failure patients who are awaiting a heart transplant or in need of long-term, permanent support for their survival,” says Sean P. Pinney, M.D., director of the Advanced Heart Failure & Cardiac Transplantation Program at Mount Sinai. “With its smaller size and intuitive safety features, we expect the new controller will enhance the daily lives of our heart failure patients.”

Mount Sinai has one of the largest LVAD programs in the United States, with its cardiothoracic surgeons implanting approximately 50 each year. The center started using LVAD technology in 2006 for advanced heart failure patients. It is used as a bridge-to-transplant (BTT) therapy or destination therapy (DT) for permanent support. In addition, Mount Sinai performs dozens of successful heart transplants each year.

“This new controller will improve the LVAD patient’s overall experience [and] heighten the quality of their life by supporting their active lifestyle, while providing pocket-sized peace of mind for them and their clinical care team,” says Kimberly Ashley, FNP-BC, the VAD program manager for the Advanced Heart Failure & Cardiac Transplantation Program. “We hope to expand the use of this pocket-sized HeartMate II controller to not only new patients but also those current HeartMate II users to give them the option to swap out their old controller for the smaller, safer version, making their lives more comfortable and normal during their daily activities.”

The new patient-friendly controller is a small computer attached to the HeartMate II LVAD via one side cable. It enhances patients’ safety by powering their LVAD to pump their heart, monitoring their vital signs and alerting them of any concerns. Its new design features a diagnostic check system to make sure device wires are intact and functional, special visual alarms, precise onscreen instructions for the patient and longer backup battery power. In addition, the device is programmed with 37 languages to serve diverse patient populations.

“We do extensive patient education training before and after LVAD surgery to teach patients exactly how their controllers work, how to closely monitor their LVAD’s status and also to be vitally aware of any issues or concerns that may arise,” says Bess Griffin, RN, BSN, the VAD coordinator for the Advanced Heart Failure & Cardiac Transplantation Program. “The staff — who have begun training on the new, smart, smaller controller — really enjoy the device’s very easy, user-friendly interface. Thanks to the new controller we are expecting patients may be trained more quickly and feel more confident in caring for their device at home.”

The pocket controller is available for new advanced heart failure patients in need who receive HeartMate II, as well as for current HeartMate II patients who wish to upgrade their existing system controllers.

For more information: www.mountsinai.org

Related Content

News | Renal Denervation| October 11, 2016
Awards from the National Institutes of Health’s Common Fund are supporting research on the peripheral nervous system,...
Heartware HVAD, ventricular assist device, artificial heart, Medtronic
News | October 05, 2016
October 5, 2016 — Medtronic said two previously communicated global voluntary recalls related to the HeartWare Intern
CardioKinetix, Parachute device, Heart Failure device therapy

The CardioKinetix Parachute device implant shown deployed in the left ventricle of a heart failure patient. The device helps remodel the ventricle to improve the heart's ability to pump blood more efficiently. 

Feature | Heart Failure| September 29, 2016 | Abha Mishra
New cardiovascular device therapies for atrial fibrillation (AF) and heart failure (HF) are rapidly evolving with the
Medtronic, CRT, cardiac resynchroniazation therapy devices, heart failure, medication adherence, retrospective analysis, HFSA 2016
News | Heart Failure| September 20, 2016
Medtronic plc announced the results of an analysis that reveals patients increasingly adhere to heart failure...
EBR Systems, FDA, WiSE Technology, Wireless Stimulation Endocardially, SOLVE-CRT study

The WiSE CRT System uses a tiny implant in the left ventricle to synchronize the heart, overcoming limitations of traditional cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in heart failure patients. Graphic courtesy of Business Wire.

News | Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Devices (CRT)| September 15, 2016
EBR Systems Inc. announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted an Investigational Device Exemption...
SynCardia, Chapter 11 reorganization, sale, Total Artificial Heart
News | Artificial Heart| September 13, 2016
August 29, 2016 — SynCardia Systems, manufacturer of the...
Carmat, bioprosthetic artificial heart, PIVOTAL study, first implantation, heart failure
News | Artificial Heart| September 09, 2016
Carmat announced that the first implantation of its bioprosthetic artificial heart within the framework of the PIVOTAL...
Sponsored Content | Videos | Heart Failure| September 02, 2016
The Respicardia Remede System is a pacemaker-like implantable device designed to improve cardiovascular health by res
Respicardia, Remede, pacemaker for sleep apnea, central sleep apnea treatment

The Respicardia Remede System is a pacemaker-like implantable device designed to improve cardiovascular health by restoring natural breathing during sleep in patients with central sleep apnea.

News | Heart Failure| September 02, 2016
September 2, 2016 — Results from an international, randomized study show that an implanted nerve stimulator significa
News | Heart Failure| August 23, 2016
August 23, 2016 — A new study of more than 13,000 people has found that so-called morbid obesity appears to stand alo
Overlay Init