Feature | June 10, 2014

Opti-SPECT/PET/CT: Five Different Imaging Systems Now Combined

Wide range of molecular imaging modalities is at researchers’ fingertips with a hybrid device dedicated for early-stage clinical trials

June 10, 2014 – Taking their pick, biomedical researchers can now conduct five different imaging studies in one scan with a state-of-the-art preclinical molecular imaging system that scientists unveiled during the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging’s 2014 Annual Meeting.

The imaging device allows single photon emission tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography (PET), X-ray computed tomography (CT), fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging — powerful imaging techniques that provide different information about anatomy and physiological processes happening within the body. With the Opti-SPECT/PET/CT system, SPECT or PET information details drug distribution and improves interpretation of optical data, while bioluminescence and fluorescence characterize additional tumor properties.  The tracers that are developed with the system will be used as a surgical guide for clinicians.

“We need to know as much as possible from our enemy: the tumor,” Frederik Beekman, Ph.D., explained.  Beekman is head of radiation technology and medical imaging and a professor at Delft University of Technology in Delft, The Netherlands. “This research proves that we can now obtain comprehensive data from five medical imaging systems in a single scan. It is minimally invasive and requires only a single dose of anesthesia.”

Opti-SPECT/PET/CT is built on a small scale for preclinical studies and allows scientists to use a gamut of imaging methods including high resolution nuclear medicine (SPECT and PET), radiological (CT) and optical imaging (fluorescence and bioluminescence). This means that information about organ function, structure and real-time physiological signals revealed within the light spectrum are all available in a synergistic fusion of advanced medical imaging. The hybrid system includes high-performance cameras and an on-board dark room. The molecular imaging platform could be used for new drug discovery, especially for imaging agents that could be used intraoperatively for patients undergoing cancer surgery.

To test the device, researchers imaged models and then mice in multiple studies using a fluorescent dye optical agent and a nuclear medicine imaging agent that combines a radioactive particle with a chemical drug compound. The agent is injected and then imaged as it homes in on and interacts with specific bodily functions. In this case, that function is angiogenesis, or the development of new blood vessels, which often proliferate as a tumor grows. Results of the study confirmed the imaging system’s functionality and proved that it was comparable to other add-on imaging platforms for preclinical studies.

For more information: www.snmmi.org

Related Content

PET, F-18 florbetaben, cardiac amyloidosis, Princess Alexandria Hospital

In a pilot study, F-18-florbetaben PET imaging appeared promising for differentiating between cardiac amyloidosis and hypertensive heart disease. Image courtesy of W. Phillip Law/Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia.

News | Nuclear Imaging| December 06, 2016
Researchers at Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, have demonstrated that cardiac amyloidosis (abnormal...
coronary CT angiography, CCTA, alcohol consumption, CAD, coronary artery disease, RSNA 2016
News | CT Angiography (CTA)| November 29, 2016
Researchers using coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) found no association between light to moderate...
Philips, DoseWise Portal 2.2, RSNA 2016, radiation dose management
Technology | Radiation Dose Management| November 21, 2016
November 21, 2016 — Philips introduced DoseWise Portal 2.2, a next-generation...
Sponsored Content | Videos | CT Angiography (CTA)| November 18, 2016
A discussion with Simon Dixon, M.D., MBChB, on the use of fractional flow reserve-computed tomography (FFR-CT) to eva
PET/CT, calcium blockages, heart attack risk, Intermountain study, American Heart Association, AHA Scientific Sessions 2016
News | PET-CT| November 15, 2016
Many people who experience chest pain but don’t have a heart attack breathe a big sigh of relief when a stress test...
Siemens Healthineers, Somatom Drive CT, computed tomography, first U.S. install, Stead Family Children's Hospital
News | Computed Tomography (CT)| November 11, 2016
Siemens Healthineers announced that University of Iowa Stead Family Children’s Hospital in Iowa City is the first...
PET/CT, atherosclerotic plaque detection, Stanford University

Application of dual-modality optical and PET/CT activity-based probe in experimental carotid inflammation model. Coronal noninvasive PET/CT scans of (A) healthy and (B) diseased mice with and without ligated carotid arteries respectively. Inset images show optical ex vivo florescence imagining of (A) healthy and (B) diseased carotid arteries.  PET/CT and optical images courtesy of Xiaowei Ma, Toshinobu Saito and Nimali Withana.

News | PET-CT| November 01, 2016
Researchers at Stanford University have demonstrated for the first time the use of a dual optical and positron emission...
GE Healthcare, Revolution CT, Whisper Drive, RSNA 2016, cardiac imaging
News | CT Angiography (CTA)| October 31, 2016
At the 2016 annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA 2016), GE Healthcare will introduce the...
NAS report, National Academies of Sciences Engineering and Medicine, Mo-99 production, highly enriched uranium, HEU, SNMMI
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers| October 28, 2016
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NAS) have released a report on the state of molybdenum-...
Siemens Healthineers, Symbia Intevo SPECT/CT system, xSPECT Quant, RSNA 2016
Technology | SPECT-CT| October 18, 2016
At the 2016 annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA 2016), Siemens Healthineers will showcase...
Overlay Init