Feature | May 30, 2014

Study Finds Bariatric Surgery Prevents Obese Patients From Developing Atrial Fibrillation

First-of-its-kind results presented at Heart Rhythm 2014 shows positive correlation between weight loss surgery and reduced risk of atrial fibrillation

May 30, 2014 — New research has found that bariatric surgery is an effective way to control weight in morbidly obese patients who are at risk for developing atrial fibrillation (AF). Bariatric or weight loss surgery is an operation on the stomach that limits food intake and is typically recommended for patients who are unable to lose weight on their own through diet and exercise.

The first study of its kind to look at the relationship between AF and bariatric surgery on a large patient population was presented at Heart Rhythm 2014, the Heart Rhythm Society’s (HRS) 35th annual scientific sessions.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than two-thirds of the adult population in the United States is considered to be overweight or obese. Obesity is a known risk factor for arrhythmias like AF, and other risk factors for AF include smoking, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. AF is the most common arrhythmia and affects more than 2.7 million American adults. It is characterized by a rapid and irregular heartbeat when the top chambers of the heart (the atria) quiver (fibrillate) erratically, sometimes faster than 300 times per minute.

“Obesity has become an epidemic in our culture and prevention efforts are more important now than ever,” said Yong-Mei Cha, M.D., FHRS, professor of medicine at Mayo Clinic. “Bariatric surgery is a preventative measure that obese patients may choose to take, and our study shows that the surgery helps them not only lose weight, but also reduces their risk of developing a serious cardiac condition like AF. It is important to continue the conversation about how to help prevent this epidemic from becoming even more widespread.”

The retrospective study was conducted in 438 patients with a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or higher and identified as good candidates for bariatric surgery. Of these patients, 326 elected to undergo surgery for weight reduction and 112 were controls who were managed medically. The diagnosis of AF was documented by electrocardiogram (ECG) or ambulatory monitors and metabolic profiles were collected at baseline and follow-up.

The baseline BMI was different in the patients that underwent surgery versus those who did not have surgery (46.9 vs. 43.2kg/m2). The prevalence of AF at baseline was not significantly different between the two groups (surgical 3.7 percent vs. control 4.5 percent p=0.63) at baseline. After a mean follow-up duration of 7.2±3.7 years, new onset of AF occurred in 3.1 percent of the surgical group, significantly lower than 12.5 percent (p<0.01) in the medically treated group. Additionally, the surgical group had a significant reduction in BMI and improvement in metabolic profile compared to the control group.

For more information: www.hrsonline.org

Related Content

Acutus Medical, AcQMap High Resolution Imaging and Mapping System, improvement over sCT

Image courtesy of Acutus Medical

News | EP Mapping and Imaging Systems| October 06, 2015
Acutus Medical, a global heart rhythm technology company, presented data that show the AcQMap High Resolution Imaging...
News | Heart Failure| October 02, 2015
Cyberonics Inc. announced results from the extension of the ANTHEM-HF clinical study (ENCORE Study). Results of the...
Tryton Side Branch Stent, clinical trial results, Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions

Tryton Side Branch Stent image courtesy of Tryton Medical

News | Stents Bifurcation| October 02, 2015
October 2, 2015 — Tryton Medical Inc.
AtriCure, cryoFORM cryoablation probe, launch
Technology | Ablation Systems| October 02, 2015
AtriCure Inc. launched the cryoFORM cryoablation probe, which offers increased probe flexibility to adapt to a variety...
Intact Vascular, TOBA II study, Tack Endovascular System

Image courtesy of Intact Vascular

News | Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD)| October 01, 2015
Intact Vascular Inc. announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted conditional approval for a U.S. and...
Johns Hopkins, sticky gel, stem cells, rat hearts, heart attacks

Hydrogel applied to beating rat hearts improves stem cell uptake by the heart muscle and speeds up tissue healing after heart attack. Image courtesy of Johns Hopkins Medicine.

News | Stem Cell Therapies| September 29, 2015
A sticky, protein-rich gel created by Johns Hopkins researchers appears to help stem cells stay on or in rat hearts and...
News | Cath Lab| September 29, 2015
The Innovation Institute announced that Boston Scientific has signed an agreement to become the founding medical device...
Eluvia drug-eluting vascular stent system, 12-month primary patency, Boston Scientific, MAJESTIC trial, CIRSE

Image courtesy of Boston Scientific

News | Stents Peripheral| September 28, 2015
New 12-month clinical trial outcomes assessing the safety and performance of the Boston Scientific Eluvia drug-eluting...
predicting arrhythmias, mcgill university, alternans patterns
News | EP Lab| September 28, 2015
Researchers have discovered how to predict some cardiac arrhythmias several steps before they even occur. It’s a...
News | Antiplatelet and Anticoagulation Therapies| September 25, 2015
The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has launched the international TWILIGHT clinical trial to test the safety...
Overlay Init