Feature | January 23, 2014

Study Finds No Significant Differences Between Commonly Used Carotid Stenting Systems in U.S.

Rates of death and stroke similarly low for three major systems

Carotid Stent Clinical Study Abbott Cordis National Cardiovascular Data Registry

Abbott Acculink Carotid Stent

January 23, 2014 — The three most common systems to place stents in blocked carotid arteries of the neck have similarly low rates of complication and death among U.S. patients, according to a study published by JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.
 
“We found low rates of in-hospital death and stroke with carotid stenting regardless of the devices used on the order of 2 percent,” said lead author Jay Giri, M.D., M.P.H., assistant professor of clinical medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. “A tremendous amount of time and energy has been spent theorizing about various technical considerations of carotid stenting systems that might make one superior to another. Our study effectively argues that continued focus on these specific technical aspects is unlikely to significantly improve stroke and death rates around carotid stenting. The bottom line is that our finding should provide support for operators to use their judgment to select the stent most favorable for a particular anatomic or clinical situation.”
 
The study analyzed 12,135 consecutive carotid stent procedures in the National Cardiovascular Data Registry performed between January 2007 and March 2012. Penn researchers compared rates of in-hospital combined death/stroke among patients treated with Acculink/Accunet (Abbott), Xact/Emboshield (Abbott) and Precise/Angioguard (Cordis) stent/embolic protection device (EPD) combinations. The study found that in nearly 80 percent of cases examined, physicians paired stents with the corresponding EPD produced by the stent manufacturer. 
 
“In other types of non-carotid stenting, doctors often mix and match products from different companies,” Giri said. “With carotids, by and large, they don’t. They use companion stents and embolic protection devices from one company.”
 
Factors that may influence this pattern of use include that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves carotid stenting systems as a unit of stent and EPD; operators may be more comfortable using an FDA-approved unit rather than “mixing and matching” stents with other EPDs; and reimbursement restrictions from Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).
 
The National Cardiovascular Data Registry supported this research by funding for statistical support.
 
For more information: www.upenn.edu

Related Content

PCI outcomes, public reporting, high-risk patients, JAMA Cardiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center study
News | Cath Lab| July 27, 2016
July 27, 2016 — A number of states mandate public reporting of mortality outcomes following certain cardiac procedure
News | Genetic Testing| July 26, 2016
July 26, 2016 — A new study has identified a genetic error that weakens the aorta, placing patients with this and sim
heart failure, after first heart attack, cancer risk, JACC study
News | Cardiac Diagnostics| July 21, 2016
People who develop heart failure after their first heart attack have a greater risk of developing cancer when compared...
mitral valve surgery outcomes, twisting of the heart, echocardiography, NICSMR, JACC Basic to Translational Science
News | Heart Valve Technology| July 20, 2016
A novel study has found a simple pre-operative echocardiographic measurement of the amount of torsion of the heart...
TITAN II Trial, Carillon Mitral Contour System, Cardiac Dimensions, Open Heart journal, functional mitral regurgitation, FMR
News | Annuloplasty Rings| July 20, 2016
New data from the TITAN II trial confirm the safety and efficacy of the Carillon Mitral Contour System in the treatment...
Mitralign, Trialign system, tricuspid regurgitation. SCOUT U.S. study, phase 1 enrollment
News | Heart Valve Technology| July 19, 2016
Mitralign Inc. announced last week it has completed subject enrollment in the SCOUT early feasibility study in the...
Abbott Absorb bioresorbable stent, dissolving BVS, first West Coast implant, Good Samaritan Hospital Los Angeles
News | Stents Bioresorbable| July 19, 2016
Good Samaritan Hospital, Los Angeles, is the first hospital on the West Coast to offer patients with coronary artery...
sudden cardiac arrest, out-of-hospital, comatose patients, University of Arizona study, wake up
News | Sudden Cardiac Arrest| July 13, 2016
Physicians may be drawing conclusions too soon about survival outcomes of patients who suffered a cardiac arrest...
radial access, inserting stents, JACC Cardiovascular Interventions study
News | Radial Access| July 13, 2016
A new study in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions supports access through the wrist, or radial access, as the default...
Abbott, Absorb bioresorbable stent, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, first Midwest implant
News | Stents Bioresorbable| July 11, 2016
University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, is among the first in the country – and the first in Ohio — to...
Overlay Init