Feature | February 10, 2014

Inflammation Testing May Predict Cardiac Risk in Corporate Wellness Programs

February 10, 2014 — Traditional fingerstick screening for glucose and lipids is proving inadequate when identifying near-term cardiovascular risk in employed populations, according to Jake Orville, CEO of Cleveland HeartLab (CHL). This position is supported by data from the American Heart Association. AHA reported 50 percent of all heart attacks and strokes occur in individuals with normal cholesterol and — for approximately 30 percent of patients with cardiovascular disease — their first sign of disease is death.
 
Orville is scheduled to present "The Role of Inflammation Testing in Corporate Wellness Programs" at the 2014 Health & Wellness Congress, Feb. 27-28. The conference, held at the Monte Carlo Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, will bring together leading corporate wellness experts to discuss emerging trends and strategies that promote well-being at the worksite.
 
"Inflammation testing provides reassurance on another important level," Orville said. "In addition to detecting employees with possible hidden risk, we are also able to provide positive feedback for those employees who are already leading healthy lifestyles. Knowing that their health habits are decreasing the inflammation in their blood vessels and their risk of an event can be a powerful incentive for people to stick with positive lifestyle changes."
 
Cleveland HeartLab is a provider of onsite testing for corporate wellness programs. A clinical laboratory and cardiovascular disease management provider, CHL offers a multi-marker approach — adding inflammation-specific blood tests to the traditional screening panel — to identify employees may go undetected. CHL's inflammatory biomarkers deliver insight into cardiovascular disease risk such as "vulnerable plaque" that may rupture into the vessel and block blood flow, leading to heart attack or stroke.
 
Orville will present both the science of inflammation testing and the results of corporate wellness programs that have adopted inflammation testing for risk stratification and targeted intervention. With new mandates from the Affordable Care Act for companies to provide screening programs to employees, obtaining the greatest efficacy as well as return on investment becomes paramount.
 
For more information: www.clevelandheartlab.com

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