Feature | August 26, 2010

Polymer Bottle Packaging Receives GE's Ecomaginationsm Approval

August 25, 2010 - GE Healthcare announced that polymer bottle packaging is now included in the company’s ecomagination campaign. +PLUSPAK, a packaging container for contrast media, offers advantages over traditional glass packaging that includes reduced storage, improved workplace safety for healthcare workers who administer contrast media to patients, and decreased cost of waste disposal.

Radiology departments using the innovative GE Healthcare +PLUSPAK packaging can reduce contrast media red bag waste weight by more than 75 percent. +PLUSPAK is made of unbreakable polypropylene and features a metal-free, twist-off cap that is easy to open and avoids cuts from metal crimps.

A survey conducted by the College of Radiographers showed that by replacing traditional contrast media glass packaging with GE Healthcare’s +PLUSPAK, a department of 24 radiographers could eliminate sharps wounds associated with glass packaging.

The same survey showed that the department could improve productivity by saving approximately 3.5 hours a month typically spent treating sharps injuries while also reducing the associated risk of bloodborne pathogen transmission.

+PLUSPAK packaging dovetails with the GE’s ecomagination criteria for improving workplace safety and convenience. +PLUSPAK packaging offers significant timesaving, cost-saving and environmental advantages over the glass packaging traditionally used to package contrast media.

For more information: www.pluspak.com.au

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