News | October 16, 2009

Correlagen Expands Cardiac Genetic Testing Services

October 16, 2009 – Correlagen recently expanded its CardioGeneScan test, the first comprehensive genetic test for the diagnosis of familial cardiac disease.

The CardioGeneScan tests for disease-causing variation in all genes known to be associated with familial cardiovascular diseases, including, cardiomyopathy, arrhythmia, thoracic aortic aneurysm, Noonan Syndrome and related diseases, and early-onset coronary artery disease. Due to its unprecedented breadth of testing, the CardioGeneScan has clinical utility for a wide range of patients with a family history of cardiac disease. Physicians will be able to assess the cardiac genetic make-up of their patients through a single test at a price that is affordable to their patients. More focused disease or gene-specific testing is also available.

“Identifying the genetic cause underlying cardiac disease in an affected family can benefit generations of family members,” said David Margulies, M.D., chairman and CEO of Correlagen. “Testing for the presence of familial disease variants can determine risk in young family members and help prevent sudden cardiac death through timely intervention. Early diagnosis can, for certain cardiac conditions, allow for early pharmacologic treatment, which can prevent severe disease and costly, painful interventions later. The CardioGeneScan test has a higher sensitivity than any other conventional genetic tests, since it looks for variation in more than one hundred relevant genes.”

The breadth of the CardioGeneScan is enabled through use of next-generation sequencing technology, which provides greater sequencing capacity at a lower per-gene cost than previous methods. As associations with inherited cardiac disease are demonstrated by researchers and clinicians in the field, Correlagen will add new genes to the CardioGeneScan to keep testing current.

In addition, physicians will receive Correlagen’s signature evergreen results report, which are revised periodically as new knowledge becomes available about the genetics of cardiac disease that impacts the clinical interpretation of previously identified variants. Such systematic report updating is enabled through Correlagen’s unique, evidence-based variant scoring protocols and result reporting processes.

For more information: www.correlagen.com

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