News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | May 22, 2017

Lantheus and GE Healthcare Sign Agreement for Worldwide Development, Commercialization of Flurpiridaz F-18

Companies also announce the extension and expansion of their existing commercial supply agreement for nuclear products through 2020

Lantheus and GE Healthcare Sign Agreement for Worldwide Development, Commercialization of Flurpiridaz F-18

May 22, 2017 — Lantheus Holdings Inc., parent company of Lantheus Medical Imaging Inc., and GE Healthcare announced the signing of a definitive license agreement  for the continued Phase III development and worldwide commercialization of flurpiridaz F-18. Flurpiridaz F-18 is an investigational positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) agent that may improve the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD), the most common form of heart disease. The definitive agreement follows the signing of a term sheet previously announced in late February 2017.

Under the definitive agreement, GE Healthcare will lead and fund the development program of flurpiridaz F-18, including the second Phase III clinical study. GE Healthcare will also have exclusive worldwide rights for the commercialization of flurpiridaz F-18. Lantheus will collaborate in both the development and commercialization process through a joint steering committee. Lantheus also maintains the option to co-promote the imaging agent in the United States.

Lantheus will receive a $5 million upfront cash payment and, if successful, up to $60 million in regulatory and sales milestones payments, plus double-digit royalties on U.S. sales and single-digit royalties on sales outside of the U.S.

Separately, the companies have also extended and expanded their current commercial agreement under which Lantheus will continue to supply GE Healthcare with TechneLite (Technetium Tc99m Generators), Gallium-67 (Gallium Citrate Ga 67 Injection) and Xenon-133 (Xenon Xe 133 Gas) through Dec. 31, 2020.

For more information: www.gehealthcare.com, www.lantheus.com

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