PET Imaging

Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear imaging technology (also referred to as molecular imaging) that enables visualization of metabolic processes in the body. The basics of PET imaging is that the technique detects pairs of gamma rays emitted indirectly by a positron-emitting radionuclide (also called radiopharmaceuticals, radionuclides or radiotracer). The tracer is injected into a vein on a biologically active molecule, usually a sugar that is used for cellular energy. PET systems have sensitive detector panels to capture gamma ray emissions from inside the body and use software to plot to triangulate the source of the emissions, creating 3-D computed tomography images of the tracer concentrations within the body.

A myocardial perfusion exam performed on the Siemens Biograph Vision PET-CT system.

A myocardial perfusion exam performed on the Siemens Biograph Vision PET-CT system.

Feature | Nuclear Imaging | June 15, 2018 | Dave Fornell, Editor

Nuclear imaging technology for both ...

Nuclear myocardial perfusion scan performed on a Biograph Vision positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT) system from Siemens Healthineers. The image shows good clarity with delineation of the left ventricular edge and papillary muscles without cardiac gating.

Nuclear myocardial perfusion scan performed on a Biograph Vision positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT) system from Siemens Healthineers. The image shows good clarity with delineation of the left ventricular edge and papillary muscles without cardiac gating.

Technology | PET-CT | June 05, 2018

June 5, 2018 — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has cleared the Biograph Vision, a new ...

Protein Clumping May Contribute to Heart Failure Development

A PET scan detects clumping proteins in rat hearts (top). The enlarged heart (right) is one with heart failure. Other PET scans showing blood flow in the rat hearts (bottom) show that the protein clumps aren't due to circulation problems. Image courtesy of Circulation Research, May 11, 2018.

News | Heart Failure | May 11, 2018

May 11, 2018 — A team led by Johns Hopkins University Researchers has discovered that protein clumps appear to...

CZT SPECT camera detectors offered by GE.

A display of CZT SPECT gamma camera detectors at RSNA 2016. These detectors are more sensitive than those used in older cameras, allowing for faster scans or lower radiation dose. 

Feature | Nuclear Imaging | September 19, 2017 | Dave Fornell

Cardiac nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) has been a mature area of imaging for years, but has recently...

Videos | Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017

Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and...

ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac Sarcoidosis
News | Cardiac Imaging | August 18, 2017

August 18, 2017 — The American Society of...

New PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition
News | PET-CT | July 25, 2017

July 25, 2017 — Using a new nuclear...

Videos | Cardiovascular Business | July 13, 2017

Randall Thompson, M.D., outlines three new CPT codes for FFR-CT, a smart phone-based single-lead ECG system and PET...

Novel PET Tracer Detects Small Blood Clots

PET images (MIP 0-60 min) of three Cynomolgus monkeys. Strong signals are detected at the sites where inserted catheters had roughened surfaces. Almost no other background signal is visible. Only accumulation in the gallbladder becomes visible at the bottom of the image. Credit: Piramal Imaging GmbH, Berlin Germany.

News | PET Imaging | July 07, 2017

July 7, 2017 — Blood clots in veins and arteries can lead to heart attack, stroke and pulmonary embolism, which are...

cardiac nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging (MIP) exam guidelines for women
News | Nuclear Imaging | June 15, 2017

June 15, 2017 — The American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) has published an updated consensus statement on...

Lantheus and GE Healthcare Sign Agreement for Worldwide Development, Commercialization of Flurpiridaz F-18
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | May 22, 2017

May 22, 2017 — Lantheus Holdings Inc., parent company of Lantheus Medical Imaging Inc., and GE Healthcare announced...

Australian Team Finds New Method for Producing PET Radiotracers in Higher Radiochemical Yields
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | April 28, 2017

April 28, 2017 — Researchers at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) have led the...

Videos | Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017

David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American...

Northwestern Memorial Hospital, MR-PET scanner, first in Illinois, Siemens Biograph mMR
News | PET-MRI | March 31, 2017

March 31, 2017 — Northwestern Memorial Hospital is now home to the Chicago area's first combined magnetic resonance...

PET imaging, atherosclerotic plaque, inflammation, Ga-68-pentixafor, Technishe Universitat Munchen, Germany

Note the high uptake of Ga-68-pentixafor on multi-planar reconstructions in the organs expressing CXCR4 such as the spleen (red arrows) and adrenal glands (yellow arrows), which was nearly completely blocked by the pre-injection of AMD 3100, a potent CXCR4 inhibitor. Strong accumulation of Ga-68-pentixafor was also found in the kidneys (asterisks) reflecting the renal clearance of the tracer. In addition, high, focal activities were detected in the abdominal aorta (red arrowheads) and right carotid artery (orange arrowheads) of atherosclerotic rabbits, whereas no significant signal could be detected in the non-injured left carotid artery (white arrowheads) of atherosclerotic and control rabbits, as well as in the abdominal aorta and right carotid artery of control rabbits. Furthermore, focal activities detected with PET in atherosclerotic plaques of the abdominal aorta and the right carotid artery decreased significantly when the same rabbit was re-imaged after blocking CXCR4 receptors. Image courtesy of Fabien Hyafil, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany

News | PET Imaging | March 03, 2017

March 3, 2017 — In the featured article of the March 2017 issue of...

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