EP Lab

This channel includes news and new technology innovations for cardiac electrophysiology (EP) systems, techniques and devices using in EP labs. This includes implantable EP devices, pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD), cardiac resychronization therapy (CRT), ablation technologies, left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion, atrial fibrilation (AF) and Holter monitors.

New Research on Tempo Temporary Pacing Lead to Be Featured at TCT 2019
News | Leads Implantable Devices | September 20, 2019

September 20, 2019 — BioTrace Medical Inc. announced the company’s key activities at the 31st annual...

Max and Debra Ernst Heart Center Opening at Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak
News | Heart Failure | September 20, 2019

September 20, 2019 — The new Max and Debra Ernst Heart Center at Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Mich., will open Sept...

Early ICD Use Prolongs Survival After Coronary Stenting
News | Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) | September 18, 2019

September 18, 2019 — Early use of an...

Noninvasive Radioablation Offers Long-term Benefits to High-risk Heart Arrhythmia Patients
News | Ablation Systems | September 17, 2019

September 17, 2019 — Treating high-risk heart patients with a single, high dose of radiation therapy can...

InfoBionic’s MoMe Kardia remote ECG monitor is an example of the newer generation devices that are replacing traditional Holter monitors. It has a single button for patients to create an alert when they are experiencing arrhythmia symptoms.

InfoBionic’s MoMe Kardia remote ECG monitor is an example of the newer generation devices that are replacing traditional Holter monitors. It has a single button for patients to create an alert when they are experiencing arrhythmia symptoms.

Feature | ECG Wireless Remote Access | August 30, 2019 | Stuart Long and Colin Movsowitz, M.D.
Until recently, cardiologists trying to diagnose and treat arrhythmias have had to deal with technological limitations...
The Apple Watch is being used to help identify and track Afib in the general population.

The Apple Watch is being used to help identify and track Afib in the general population.  

Blog | Wearables | August 29, 2019
Lenox Hill Hospital Opens New Heart Rhythm Center
News | EP Lab | August 27, 2019

August 27, 2019 – Lenox Hill Hospital (New York, N.Y.) has established a brand new Heart Rhythm Center dedicated to...

FDA Approves Barostim Neo System for Advanced Heart Failure Patients. Similar to a pacemaker, the Barostim Neo System uses a pulse generator implanted below the collar bone with a lead that attaches to the carotid artery in the neck. It delivers electrical impulses to baroreceptors in the neck, which sense how blood is flowing through the carotid arteries and relays information to the brain. The brain, in turn, sends signals to the heart and blood vessels that relax the blood vessels.

Similar to a pacemaker, the Barostim Neo System uses a pulse generator implanted below the collar bone with a lead that attaches to the carotid artery in the neck. It delivers electrical impulses to baroreceptors in the neck, which sense how blood is flowing through the carotid arteries and relays information to the brain. The brain, in turn, sends signals to the heart and blood vessels that relax the blood vessels and inhibit the production of stress-related hormones to reduce heart failure symptoms.

Technology | Heart Failure | August 19, 2019

August 19, 2019 — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted market clearance the Barostim Neo...

Computer Simulations May Treat Most Common Heart Rhythm Disorder

The OPTIMA (Optimal Target Identification via Modelling of Arrhythmogenesis) simulator uses contrast-enhanced MRI scans to create personalized digital replicas of a patient's heart to guide catheter abation for atrial fibrillation. Image courtesy of Patrick M. Boyle and Natalia A. Trayanova.

News | EP Mapping and Imaging Systems | August 19, 2019

August 19, 2019 — Scientists at Johns Hopkins have successfully created...

Damaged Hearts Rewired With Nanotube Fibers

Researchers at Texas Heart Institute and Rice University have confirmed that flexible, conductive fibers made of carbon nanotubes can bridge damaged tissue to deliver electrical signals and keep hearts beating despite congestive heart failure or dilated cardiomyopathy or after a heart attack. Image courtesy of Texas Heart Institute.

News | EP Lab | August 15, 2019

August 15, 2019 — Thin, flexible fibers made of carbon nanotubes have now proven able to bridge damaged heart...

Cardiac Device Complications Vary Widely Among Hospitals
News | EP Lab | July 31, 2019

July 31, 2019 — The chances of patients experiencing complications after having a cardiac device implanted vary...

Dr. Markus Krane, deputy director of the Cardiac and Vascular Surgery Unit at the DHM helped compile an atlas of the heart and discovered myosin binding protein H-like (MYBPHL) occurs only in the atria of the heart. Researchers began using it as a blood test biomarker to assess the success of atrial fibrillation ablation procedures.

Dr. Markus Krane, deputy director of the Cardiac and Vascular Surgery Unit at the DHM helped compile an atlas of the heart and discovered myosin binding protein H-like (MYBPHL) occurs only in the atria of the heart. Researchers began using it as a blood test biomarker to assess the success of atrial fibrillation ablation procedures.

Feature | Atrial Fibrillation | July 24, 2019

July 24, 2019 — Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is a common abnormal heart rhythm. It is treated either with medications...

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