News | October 07, 2009

Baptist Using Therapeutic Hypothermia to Save Heart Attack Patients

October 7, 2009 – Baptist Medical Center's Emergency Department will begin using a new procedure, called therapeutic hypothermia, starting Oct. 19 to increase a patient's chances of survival after cardiac arrest.

The new procedure involves decreasing the core body temperature to 89º F after the patient’s heart has been restarted. Cooling may be started by paramedics if they have been able to restart the heart prior to getting the patient to the hospital. This involves injecting a patient with chilled intravenous (IV) fluids. Portable coolers will be on ambulances to cool down the IV fluids. Upon further stabilization at Baptist's emergency room, the patient then undergoes placement of a specialized cooling catheter into a large vein in the chest and abdomen, which safely cools them down to 89º.

"The American Heart Association has recommended therapeutic hypothermia following resuscitation from cardiac arrest, because the treatment has been shown to significantly improve a patient's chances of survival without brain damage," said Baptist Emergency Department Medical Director Eric Zoog, M.D.

He added that Baptist has already used this technique on one patient utilizing chilled water blankets in direct contact with the patient's skin, which enabled the patient to return to the same quality of life he had prior to his heart attack. "This treatment allows us to reduce the impact of a heart attack on a patient's body and increase their chance of survival once they get to the hospital," he explained.??Brain injury, heart dysfunction, systemic inflammation and the underlying disease that caused the cardiac arrest all contribute to the high death rate of patients who initially have their pulse restarted. Collectively, these symptoms are known as post-cardiac arrest syndrome.?This treatment method is able to increase not only a patient's chances of survival, but survival with normal or nearly normal brain function by a factor of 2.5. It is estimated every sixth time a cardiac arrest patient is treated with therapeutic hypothermia, physicians can rescue one life.?Baptist and its ER physicians made a donation of coolers to American Medical Response Oct. 5.

"This is the only therapy that nearly triples the rate of survival after cardiac arrest," Dr. Zoog said. "Strides like this have not been made with cardiac arrest in over 30 years – since the invention of CPR."

Baptist is the only hospital in the Metro Jackson area with Chest Pain Accreditation from the Society of Chest Pain Centers.
For more information: www.mbhs.org

Related Content

therapeutic hypothermia, children, cardiac arrest, treatment, temperature
Feature | May 04, 2015
A large-scale, multicenter study has shown that therapeutic hypothermia does not improve survival rates or reduce brain...
News | December 11, 2014
Researchers at Okayama University in collaboration with several medical centers in Japan have demonstrated the safety...
Feature | September 19, 2014
September 19, 2014 — According to a new study, peritoneal hypothermia is feasible for patients who have suffered ST-...
Technology | July 10, 2014
July 10, 2014 — Life Recovery Systems announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved two...
therapeutic hypothermia, Philips InnerCool

The Philips InnerCool RTx system was used in the CHILL-MI study for use in STEMI patients.

Feature | February 03, 2014 | Dave Fornell
Use of therapeutic hypothermia is used to prevent neurological damage in patients who suffer sudden cardiac arrest (SCA...
BeneChill RhinoChill Therapeutic Hypothermia Cath Lab Intranasal Cooling System
News | January 22, 2014
BeneChill Inc. received the 2014 Frost & Sullivan Award for Technology Innovation Leadership for its RhinoChill...
rhinochill, RhinoChill, benechill, BeneChill

RhinoChill IntraNasal Cooling System

News | December 03, 2013
With the benefits of conventional strategies for therapeutic hypothermia following cardiac arrest being called in to ...
therapeutic hypothermia temperature management cath lab clinical trial study
Feature | November 01, 2013
clinical trial shows that rapidly cooling...
News | October 01, 2013
The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) announced the late breaking trials and first report investigations that...
News | August 06, 2013
Vanderbilt Heart and Vascular Institute is participating in the VELOCITY study, a randomized controlled clinical study...
Overlay Init