Technology | Ultrasound Imaging | January 12, 2017

GE Introduces Its First App-Based, Pocket-Sized Dual-Probe Ultrasound

Vscan Extend offers high image quality, wireless connectivity and cloud integration with a touch-screen interface

GE Healthcare, Vscan Extend, app-based ultrasound, dual-probe, RSNA 2017
GE Healthcare, Vscan Extend, app-based ultrasound, portable, paramedic, RSNA 2017

January 12, 2017 — GE Healthcare unveiled its new generation of pocket-sized, dual-probe ultrasound, the Vscan Extend. From the hospital and ambulance to more rural environments, Vscan Extend uses high image quality and wireless connectivity1 to help users increase clinical confidence and improve patient care.

“Vscan Extend completely changes the game in how we are able to use ultrasound both inside and outside hospitals,” said Guy Lloyd, M.D., clinical cardiologist and lead for echocardiography at Barts Heart Centre in London. “For the first time on handheld ultrasounds, we can pre-populate the device with images thanks to the DICOM integration, which then cascades the images through PACS [picture archiving and communication systems], enabling seamless collaboration with colleagues in our hospital system. As a result, we are able to provide rapid diagnostics to patients, increase efficiency and save on cost.” 

Vscan Extend offers an intuitive touch screen and weighs just 406 grams. The system offers smooth integration with hospitals’ DICOM systems2 to complement existing documentation and reporting solutions along with cloud-based image storage and communication3. Vscan Extend is GE Healthcare’s first ultrasound system to leverage the GE Marketplace that offers applications with a range of capabilities, such as assessing heart failure patients, measuring bladder volume, and offering cloud-based image communication. The system comes with high-level data security standards ensuring encrypted data both at rest and on the move. 

Vscan Extend is not currently available in all countries. Today, it is commercially available in Europe; it will also be available in the United States by the end of January. 

The device has been verified for limited use outside of professional healthcare facilities and has not been evaluated for use during transport. Use is restricted to environmental properties described in the user manual.

For more information: www.gehealthcare.com 

1. Valid for systems with Wi-Fi configurations.

2. Valid for systems with DICOM configurations.

3. The Vscan Extend app includes the interface to Tricefy, a cloud-based case exchange solution that is separately provided by Trice Imaging. Customers may elect to try Tricefy via trial period by entering into an agreement with Trice Imaging. Trice Imaging bears sole responsibility for the Tricefy Uplink app and Tricefy cloud solution.

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