Feature | HIMSS | March 05, 2019

Photo Gallery of New Technologies at HIMSS 2019

 SoftServe's “Touch My Heart” work-in-progress allows anyone wearing an AR headset to see and interact with the heart.

One of many examples of augmented reality and virtual reality displayed at HIMSS and part of the photo gallery

A demonstration of virtual reality (VR) to aid neuro-surgical planning and to help educate patients on what will happen during their procedures. This demo was in the e+ and Surgical Theater VR booths.

A demonstration of virtual reality (VR) to aid neuro-surgical planning and to help educate patients on what will happen during their procedures. This demo was in the e+ and Surgical Theater VR booths.

Siemens digital twin heart

Siemens showed a technology called digital twin heart. This work-in-progress creates a digital organ that has the same electrophysiology characteristics as the patient’s real heart, created from a patient’s ECG, MRI scan and other data.  <a href="https://www.itnonline.com/videos/video-creating-virtual-organs-medical-imaging-test-implantable-devices"_blank">Link to a VIDEO example.</a>

DAIC and ITN magazines created a gallery of photos from the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society (HIMSS) 2019 meeting in February to highlight some of the interesting new technologies we found on the expo floor. 

View the photo gallery

The conference has about 45,000 attendees and more than 1,300 vendors across a vast show floor. The conference has become one of the most important in medicine over the past decade because of the interconnected, central role of electronic medical records, reporting systems and data created, stored and transferred with everything from ECGs and hemodynamic data, to radiology and echocardiography images. 

Find news and videos from HIMSS 2019.

 

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