News | October 31, 2014

Michigan Physician Among First in United States to Use Drug-Eluting Balloon to Treat PAD

Device successfully cleared blockages in limbs of two patients

October 31, 2014 — Metro Health (Michigan) cardiovascular specialist Jihad Mustapha, M.D., is one of the first physicians in the United States to use a new medical device to treat peripheral artery disease (PAD).

The nationally recognized physician dedicated to amputation prevention successfully debuted the new Lutonix 035 Drug Coated Balloon (DCB) percutaneous transluminal angioplasty catheter in two procedures at Metro Health. Developed by C.R. Bard, Inc., the new device allows physicians to re-open arteries in the thigh and knee when narrowed as a result of PAD.

Mustapha successfully used the new device to clear blockages in the limbs of two Metro Health patients, who traveled from Florida and California for the procedures.

This is the fourth new medical device to debut at Metro Health to treat PAD. Over the past two years, Mustapha and other cardiovascular physicians have been selected to be among the first in the United States—and on at least one occasion, the world—to use breakthrough technology, successfully treating hundreds of patients and preventing amputation of their feet or legs.

In June, Mustapha traveled to Washington, D.C., to testify on the effectiveness of the new device, helping to secure its U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval. Lutonix 035 DCB uses the drug paclitaxel, which has previously been used as a cancer chemotherapy drug, to prevent blockages from recurring in arteries after balloon angioplasty. Prior to using the Lutonix 035 DCB, Mustapha used a traditional angioplasty balloon without a drug coating. He then used the new device to fully open the artery and apply the drug to the artery wall.

PAD is a common progressive circulatory problem in which narrowed arteries block the blood flow to arms and legs, causing numbness, leg pain, tissue damage and leading to amputation.

The hospital has developed a nationally recognized specialty in the treatment of PAD and amputation prevention, last year treating scores of patients from around Michigan, across the country and throughout the world. Led by Mustapha, Metro Heart & Vascular physicians utilize leading-edge technology, such as the new Lutonix device, to clear blockages and restore circulation in even the most challenging of cases.

“The new Lutonix drug coated balloon is a game changer in treating patients who suffer from PAD and its most advanced state which is critical limb ischemia, or CLI,” said Mustapha. “Because PAD and CLI are progressive, patients often face recurring interventions. Simply put, once we re-open a vessel, the body can overcompensate for the repair by sending new tissue to close the vessel again.

“Research shows that vessels treated with the Lutonix DCB remain open significantly longer, helping patients avoid the costs, inconvenience and discomfort of repeated procedures. Over time, the device will allow us to treat more patients, thus helping them remain active and engaged with their lives and families.”
 

For more information: www.bardpv.com, www.metrohealth.net

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