News | Womens Cardiovascular Health | December 06, 2017

Pregnant Asian Women Developing Hypertension at Increased Risk for Heart Failure

Women who develop high blood pressure during pregnancy are more likely to experience heart failure and heart attack. American Heart Association (AHA), #AHA2017

December 6, 2017 — Women who develop high blood pressure during pregnancy are more likely to experience heart problems within a few years of giving birth, according to preliminary research presented at the 2017 American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions in November.

Researchers from University of California San Francisco followed the time to hospitalization from heart failure and heart attack for nearly 1.6 million women in California. Women who experienced any form of pregnancy-related hypertension, including gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, chronic hypertension and chronic hypertension combined with preeclampsia, were more frequently hospitalized for heart failure than women who did not experience high blood pressure during pregnancy. 

However, the likelihood of heart failure hospitalization depended on the patient’s racial background. Black women had the lowest likelihood of heart failure hospitalization while Asian/Pacific Islander women had the highest. White and Hispanic/Latina women fell between the two groups.

Women who experienced gestational hypertension, preeclampsia and chronic hypertension were also more likely to be hospitalized for a heart attack, but unlike with heart failure, the likelihood of hospitalization for heart attack was not influenced by racial background. The analysis demonstrates that racial background influences risk of heart failure hospitalization but not hospitalization for heart attack in women with pregnancy-related hypertension.

The study was presented by Leila Y. Beach, M.D., from the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine.

Links to other AHA 2017 Late-breaking Trials

For more information: heart.org

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