Feature | Stents Bioresorbable | September 04, 2015

Absorbable Stents Prove Non-Inferior to Metal in STEMI Study

Abbott's bioresorbable vascular scaffold performs similarly to gold-standard bare metal stent

ABSORB STEMI TROFI II trial, ESC 2015, bioresorbable vascular scaffold, BVS, STEMI patients

Image courtesy of Abbott Vascular

September 4, 2015 — A drug-eluting coronary stent made of absorbable material performed similarly to gold-standard metal among patients with an ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), according to results of the ABSORB STEMI TROFI II trial.

“This is the first randomized, controlled trial to compare the stent coverage between these two types of stents in the STEMI setting,” said senior investigator Patrick W Serruys, M.D., Ph.D., who presented the findings at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2015, with simultaneous publication in the European Heart Journal.

Unlike metallic stents which remain permanently in place, absorbable stents — also known as “bioresorbable vascular scaffolds” (BVS) — eventually biodegrade, restoring the natural physiology of coronary vessels – “a factor which may be more important in STEMI patients, who tend to have delayed arterial healing as compared to patients with stable coronary artery disease,” explained Serruys, from the International Centre for Circulatory Health, Imperial College, London.

The study included 191 STEMI patients (mean age 58.6 years) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention at eight medical centers.

Patients were randomized to receive either the Abbott Vascular Absorb BVS (n=95) or a metallic stent (n=96), both types being “drug-eluting”, meaning coated in everolimus, a drug to reduce the risk of vessel reblockage.

The primary endpoint of the study was a six-month score assessing stent coverage and restenosis of the vessel using coronary optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging.

Given the chosen criteria for non-inferiority, the score was similar (1.74 in the BVS arm and 2.80 in the metallic stent arm), indicating almost complete arterial healing in both groups and meeting the criteria for non-inferiority (P<0.001).

Clinical events measured as a composite of cardiac death, target vessel myocardial infarction (MI), or clinically-driven target lesion revascularization, were 1.1 percent in the BVS arm compared to 0 percent in the metallic stent arm (P=ns). There was one case of definite subacute thrombosis in the BVS arm.

“This trial provides the basis for further exploration in clinical outcomes trials,” noted Serruys.

The study was funded by Abbott, the European Cardiovascular Research Institute (ECRI) and Terumo Europe N.V.

Serruys is a member of the international advisory board of Abbott.

For more information: www.escardio.org

Related Content

Shockwave Announces Collaboration With Abiomed on Physician Training
News | Cath Lab | December 14, 2018
Shockwave Medical announced a new investment and collaboration agreement with Abiomed Inc. As outlined by the agreement...
Sponsored Content | Videos | Cath Lab | October 24, 2018
Michael Flaherty, M.D., discusses a study published in Circulation Research which finds that use of hemodynamic suppo
Philips Showcases Integrated Solutions for Cardiovascular Care at TCT 2018
News | Cath Lab | September 20, 2018
At the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) annual meeting, Sept. 21–25 in San Diego, Philips is showcasing...
Sponsored Content | Videos | Cath Lab | September 19, 2018
William O’Neill, M.D., outlines his recent clinical publication of AMICS patients from the Impella Quality (IQ) datab
A complex PCI case to revascularize a chronic total occlusion (CTO) at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. Complex PCI and CHIP cases are increasing patient volumes in the cath lab and using a minimally invasive approach in patients who otherwise would have been sent for CABG. Pictured is Khaldoon Alaswad, M.D. DAIC staff photo by Dave Fornell

A complex PCI case to revascularize a chronic total occlusion (CTO) at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. Complex PCI and CHIP cases are increasing patient volumes in the cath lab and using a minimally invasive approach in patients who otherwise would have been sent for CABG. Pictured is Khaldoon Alaswad, M.D. (right) who is proctoring a fellow in treating CTOs.

Feature | Cath Lab | September 13, 2018 | Artur Kim, Kamran Zamanian
Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a multifaceted disease that demands various approaches in terms of diagnosis and tre
Videos | Cath Lab | August 13, 2018
Jeffrey Schussler, M.D., FACC, FSCAI, FSCCT, FACP, interventional cardiologist at Baylor Scott White Heart and Vascul
Shockwave Launches Coronary Intravascular Lithotripsy in Europe
News | Cath Lab | May 30, 2018
Shockwave Medical recently announced the European commercial availability of Intravascular Lithotripsy (IVL) for...
Overlay Init