Feature | September 24, 2013

Michigan Hospital First to Install Noiseless MRI System

Spectrum Health is the world’s first hospital to dramatically quiet MRI exams with GE Silent Scan

GE Healthcare Silent Scan MRI Systems Noiseless Spectrum Health Michigan

September 24, 2013 —GE Healthcare reported that Silent Scan, a revolutionary technology that dramatically quiets magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exams, is now commercially available and growing in clinical adoption around the world. Silent Scan addresses one of the most significant impediments to patient comfort — excessive acoustic noise generated during an MRI scan. Conventional MRI scanners can generate noise in excess of 110 decibels, roughly equivalent to rock concerts and requiring ear protection. GE’s exclusive Silent Scan technology is designed to reduce MR scanner noise to ambient (background) sound levels and improve a patient’s MRI exam experience.

A sample of the noise level of the system is available online.  

GE Healthcare has been obtaining user feedback on Silent Scan from several customers in the United States, including Spectrum Health in Grand Rapids, Mich. Mark DeLano of Spectrum Health was the first to implement the technology in the world as part of a research collaboration with GE Healthcare. 

“The response from our patients has been very gratifying. They tell us that the Silent Scans are essentially silent compared to conventional MRI scans. This reduces their anxiety about the procedure. We are particularly looking forward to providing this to our pediatric patients, claustrophobic patients and our patients being scanned in the operating room where the noise of the traditional MRI can be disruptive. Better communication is better medicine. Silent Scan enables this — whether it is a parent comforting a child in the scanner or staff administering the exam,” said DeLano.

Noise is one of the major complaints from patients who undergo a MRI exam. Historically, medical manufacturers have addressed the noise issue by using a combination of acoustic dampening material or performance degradation to reduce the noise level. With Silent Scan, a radically new type of 3-D MR acquisition, in combination with proprietary high-fidelity gradient and RF system electronics, noise is not merely dampened; it is virtually eliminated at the source.

With Silent Scan, patients and families will be able to experience a more relaxing scanning environment even being able to converse during the scan. Silent Scan is available on GE’s 1.5T and 3.0T systems currently available for routine head examinations. 

Related Content

Cardiac MR, also called cardiac MRI or heart MRI, can offer data above and beyond anatomical imaging.

Cardiac MR can offer data above and beyond anatomical imaging, which is the main reason why this system was installed at Baylor Scott White Heart Hospital in Dallas. The system is a dedicated heart MRI scanner.

Feature | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 19, 2020 | Dave Fornell, Editor
Videos | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | December 20, 2019
James Carr, M.D., chair of the Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, and incoming 2020 President of the...
Greater Left Ventricular Mass Increases Risk of Heart Failure
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | October 21, 2019
Elevated left ventricular mass, known as left-ventricular hypertrophy, is a stronger predictor of coronary artery...
Heart MRI example. An example of a cardiac MRI exam showing perfusion defects in the heart muscle, amount of infarct and edema and a score for myocardial salvage which can help determine if revasularization will help restore heart function.

A example of a cardiac MRI exam showing perfusion defects in the heart muscle, amount of infarct and edema and a score for myocardial salvage, which can help determine if revasularization will restore heart function following a heart attack.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | October 07, 2019
October 7, 2019 – A recent study published in the New England Journal of Medicine supports the use of
Machine Learning Could Offer Faster, More Precise Cardiac MRI Scan Results
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | September 25, 2019
Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis can be performed significantly faster with similar precision to...
Haojie Wang, M.D., director of advanced cardiovascular MRI and a member of the heart valve clinic at Baylor Scott White Heart Hospital, Dallas. His hospital installed a dedicated cardiac Siemens 1.5T MRI scanner in 2018 because MRI offers soft tissue visualization not available on CT or ultrasound.

Haojie Wang, M.D., director of advanced cardiovascular MRI and a member of the heart valve clinic at Baylor Scott White Heart Hospital, Dallas. His hospital installed a dedicated cardiac Siemens 1.5T MRI scanner in 2018 because MRI offers soft tissue visualization not available on CT or ultrasound.

Feature | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | September 06, 2019 | Jeff Zagoudis, Associate Editor
Traditionally, computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound have been the workhorse imaging modalities in the world of car
Displacement comparison at the end-systolic frame and final frame

Displacement comparison at the end-systolic frame and final frame. The three patients (V6, V10, V16) with different left-ventricle walls are shown. Point-to-surface distance is a measure to estimate the distance of a point from the reference surface. Image courtesy of WMG, University of Warwick

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | August 28, 2019
A new 3-D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) computing technique developed by scientists in WMG at the University of...
FDA Issues Draft Guidance on Medical Device Safety in MRI Environment
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | August 01, 2019 | Jeff Zagoudis, Associate Editor
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a new draft guidance titled Testing and Labeling Medical Devices for...
360 Photos | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 17, 2019
This is a dedicated cardiac Siemens 1.5T MRI system installed at the...