News | Artificial Intelligence | November 11, 2018

AI Algorithm Outperforms Most Cardiologists in Heart Murmur Detection

Eko’s heart murmur detection algorithm outperformed four out of five cardiologists in recent clinical study

AI Algorithm Outperforms Most Cardiologists in Heart Murmur Detection

November 12, 2018 — At the American Heart Association’s (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2018, Nov. 10-12 in Chicago, Eko presented a clinical study abstract revealing the first murmur detection algorithm to outperform the majority of participating cardiologists. Entitled “Artificial Intelligence Detects Pediatric Heart Murmurs With Cardiologist-Level Accuracy,” the study demonstrates the power of machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) to enhance cardiac care.

The neural network AI algorithm was trained on thousands of heart sound recordings. The algorithm was then tested on an independent dataset of pediatric heart sounds and compared to gold-standard echocardiogram imagery. Five pediatric cardiologists also listened to the heart sound recordings and independently made a determination whether a recording contained a murmur. This advancement will help narrow the clinical skill gap between the 27,000 cardiologists in the U.S. — the experts at murmur detection — and the 3.8 million other clinicians who are less experienced in the identification of heart murmurs through a stethoscope.  

A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association revealed that, on average, internal medicine and family practice physician residents misdiagnose 80 percent of common cardiac events.1 Cardiologists on the other hand, can effectively diagnose 90 percent of cardiac events using a stethoscope.2

“When it comes to healthcare, data almost always leads to better results because practitioners are able to make more informed decisions,” said Nicholas Slamon, M.D., pediatric critical care physician at Nemours Children’s Health System, Delaware. “Eko’s technology is leveraging the largest available dataset of previously captured heart sounds to elevate the skills of clinicians and in turn provide guidance on how to diagnose, and subsequently treat, serious, often fatal cardiac conditions. It’s a powerful advancement for the world of medicine.”

Eko’s murmur screening algorithm, when coupled with the company’s U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared Eko Core and Eko Duo devices, will enable any and all clinicians to more accurately screen for heart murmurs.

Eko is currently pursuing FDA clearance for the algorithm and will be rolling it out with its existing cardiac monitoring devices upon securing regulatory clearance.

For more information: www.ekohealth.com

References

1. Mangione S., Nieman L.Z. Cardiac auscultatory skills of internal medicine and family practice trainees. A comparison of diagnostic proficiency. Journal of the American Medical Association, Sept. 3, 1997. doi:10.1001/jama.1997.03550090041030

2. Thompson W.R. In defence of auscultation: a glorious future? Heart Asia, Feb. 1, 2017. doi:  [10.1136/heartasia-2016-010796]

Related Content

The startup company Genetesis introduced a new cardiac imaging modalityit calls magnetocardiography. The scanner creates images from the biomagnetic activity of the heart, using the polarization and depolarization of the heart during the cardiac cycle. This was at AHA.18, AHA 2018 - the American Heart Association annual meeting

The startup company Genetesis introduced a new cardiac imaging modality it calls magnetocardiography. The scanner creates images from the biomagnetic activity of the heart, using the polarization and depolarization of the heart during the cardiac cycle.

Feature | AHA | January 14, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor
Here are a few of the takeaways from the clinical studies presented and new technology shown on the exhibit floor at
Russel Pate, Ph.D., Univerity Of South Carolina, chair of the National Physical Activity Plan Alliance. #AHA18

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released the second edition of the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans at the American Heart Association’s (AHA) 2018 Scientific Sessions this week. Chicago. It provides evidence-based recommendations for youth ages three through 17 and adults to safely get the physical activity and was a major topic of discussion. Pictured here is Russel Pate, Ph.D., Univerity Of South Carolina, chair of the National Physical Activity Plan Alliance, presenting on the main stage at AHA, with details relat d to the new guidelines.

Feature | AHA | November 20, 2018
November 7, 2018 — Here is a list of some of the key clinical trial presentations at the 2018...
Videos | AHA | November 19, 2018
DAIC Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most innovative new cardiovascular technologies on display on th
Overlay Init