News | February 22, 2010

Companies Collaborate to Promote Drug-Eluting Balloon Technology

The SeQuent Please drug-eluting balloon catheter was cleared for use in Europe in 2009.

February 22, 2010 – As part of a comarketing and trademark license agreement between MEDRAD Inc. and B. Braun Melsungen AG, the companies will both promote the Paccocath drug-eluting balloon (DEB) technology.

The Paccocath technology has been shown in multiple clinical trials to keep the artery open wider (reduce late lumen loss) over time in patients with peripheral arterial disease and coronary artery disease (CAD).??The Paccocath technology will be used in both MEDRAD’s and B. Braun’s drug-eluting balloons.

Under the agreement, B. Braun is permitted to use the Paccocath trademark in connection with promotion and marketing of its drug eluting balloon products. Both companies will also feature the Paccocath technology at various tradeshows, sponsored educational seminars and symposia, and on respective informational Web sites.??

“We feel it is important to distinguish the positive clinical results of the unique Paccocath technology in the marketplace. This agreement allows us to do that in cooperation with B. Braun.” said Kraig McEwen, senior vice president of MEDRAD Interventional/Possis. “We are delighted to be able to develop and market the Paccocath technology, which provides both companies the opportunity to offer a greater variety of products designed to improve patient treatment and outcomes,” said Gerd Wacker, senior vice president from B. Braun Vascular Systems.

The Paccocath technology is a proprietary drug matrix applied to an angioplasty balloon. The matrix consists of Paclitaxel and a radiologic contrast agent Ultravist 370. The matrix helps evenly distribute and elute the drug when the balloon is inflated against the vessel wall.

Clinical results to date (including the THUNDER, PEPCAD, ISR, and FEMPAC trials) show that using the Paccocath technology during an interventional procedure keeps coronary and peripheral vessels open wider over time compared to standard therapies.??Bayer Schering Pharma AG is the owner of the Paccocath trademark and technology and is developing it for market through Bayer affiliate, MEDRAD Inc. under the brand name Cotavance. MEDRAD is in the process of obtaining CE mark certification and is preparing a U.S. clinical trial to support FDA approval for its Cotavance product.

B. Braun licensed the Paccocath for use on its SeQuent Please Drug Eluting Balloon Catheter for the treatment of narrowing of the coronary arteries. SeQuent Please recently received the CE mark in Europe.

For more information: www.medrad.com, www.bayerhealthcare.com, www.bbraunusa.com

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