News | April 06, 2009

Compellent Technologies Offers Flexible Image Storage Solution

April 6, 2009 - Compellent Technologies Inc.‘s storage area network (SAN) is reportedly helping healthcare customers overcome IT challenges and enhance patient care through better data storage management.

To solve its imaging storage problems and at the same time minimize IT administration burdens, Princeton Radiology (Princeton, NJ) chose Compellent’s automated tiered storage and thin provisioning software. These technologies migrate more than 85 percent of Princeton Radiology’s data, which is inactive, to lower storage tiers in the Compellent SAN, where it is anticipated to remain available and easily accessible for the lifetime of the patients.

“Princeton Radiology specializes in all sorts of digital imaging technologies for the diagnosis, treatment and research of disease, including X-rays, MRIs, PET/CT scans, mammograms and ultrasounds, and over time, that data adds up,” said Alan Howard, director of information technology, Princeton Radiology. “The Compellent SAN gives us the capacity and the management applications to expand our system quickly and keep patient data online and available, so we can provide them with timely and accurate diagnoses and treatment.”

Given the critical importance of its picture archive communication system (PACS) for both doctors and patients, Kansas Spine Hospital (Wichita) chose the Compellent SAN in large part due to its cost-effective disaster recovery capabilities built on continuous snapshots and thin replication software. In the event of a data loss, the IT team can recover data in minutes by automating failover and recovery from three sites as needed. By choosing the Compellent SAN, the hospital estimates that it saved approximately 85 percent of the acquisition costs for an alternate backup and recovery solution, while providing unmatched security to the data the hospital’s doctors require to provide proper care.

By combining Compellent storage virtualization with VMware server virtualization, Pacific Hospital of Long Beach (CA), a full-service teaching hospital, eliminated 75 percent of its physical servers and maximizes existing IT assets. Through thin provisioning, the hospital allocates storage capacity up-front, but only consumes physical capacity when data is written, enabling it to purchase storage on-demand.

For more information: www.compellent.com/healthcare

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