News | Enterprise Imaging | May 25, 2017

Exa Enterprise Imaging Provides Specialty Viewing for Cardiac Imaging

Konica Minolta will highlight cross-department enterprise imaging and workflow solution at SIIM 2017

May 25, 2017 — At the 2017 annual meeting of the Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM), June 1-3 in Pittsburgh, Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas Inc. will showcase advanced specialty viewing capabilities of the Exa Enterprise Imaging platform. The platform facilitates the viewing of large medical imaging files, such as 3-D mammography, cardiac imaging and nuclear medicine, quickly and efficiently on existing workstations throughout the enterprise. With the Exa diagnostic quality Zero Footprint Universal Viewer, clinicians can view these images and more from any modality and any vendor. Exa delivers relevant priors from the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) or vendor neutral archive (VNA), including cardiovascular images, quickly and securely.

Exa delivers a cross-department enterprise imaging and workflow solution. Through server-side rendering, the platform provides fast access to large files without the need for prefetching. The Exa Universal Viewer and VNA enable viewing of DICOM and non-DICOM images from any device. Additionally, Exa provides cybersecurity with no data transferred to or stored on workstations.

Cardiologists can use Exa to read and report cardiac imaging studies, including echocardiography and stress echocardiography, either onsite or remotely. Exa offers user-customizable reporting for all exams, delivering a unified structured reporting that eliminates tedious and error-prone manual entry of measurements and calculation data with DICOM SR auto-population.

Nuclear medicine specialists can also utilize the Exa Universal Viewer to read positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) studies from any location. Exa supports Fusion, MPR, MIP and full measurement tools for these studies.

For more information: www.konicaminolta.com/medicalusa 

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