News | November 26, 2007

Fujifilm Introduces Portable X-Ray System

November 27, 2007 – Fujifilm Medical Systems USA partnered with Hitachi to introduce at RSNA 2007 the FCR Go portable digital X-ray system, integrating Fujifilm's FCR Carbon XL CR reader and a notebook version of the Flash IIP console with the Hitachi portable, reportedly providing image availability in 23 seconds.

The system, awaiting 510(k) clearance, is said to allow the flexibility to use an FCR cassette. FCR Go is the reportedly first portable digital X-ray system to provide remote users with the same functionality and image processing features available at the fixed technologist workstation in the imaging department. All of the image optimization and advanced image processing features of Fujifilm's Flash IIP are available at the portable console allowing for comprehensive image adjustment to be completed remotely, and images can be sent directly to PACS without additional intervention at another workstation.

Because the system will accommodate wireless communication or hardwire connection to a facility's network, the patient worklist is always available from the RIS/HIS and images can be transmitted to PACS immediately following study completion for quicker interpretation. The system also offers Fujifilm's SpeedLink X-ray Control Software for a fully integrated interface between the portable X-ray generator and the FCR reader; this allows techniques to be set automatically according to the exam type.

FCR Go’s design is based on field research and is reportedly lightweight, durable, and does not require a tethered cable to interfere with positioning or patient comfort. The telescopic arm allows for easy positioning of the X-ray tube and can be located as low as 23 inches from the floor to accommodate a wide range of exams, according to the company.

The FCR Go requires 510(k) clearance and is not yet available for sale in the U.S. It is expected to be available in the U.S. in mid-2008.

For more information: www.fujimed.com

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