News | Heart Failure | July 22, 2015

Heart Failure Readmissions Reduced With New Optimization Approach

CRT device with adaptive algorithm found to reduce heart failure readmissions 16.6 percent over 30 days

heart failure, Adaptive CRT trial, AdaptivCRT algorithm, readmissions

July 22, 2015 — Heart failure patients had a significantly lower chance of being readmitted within 30 days of discharge when treated with a cardiac resynchronization therapy device (CRT) equipped with an algorithm to automatically deliver and adjust therapy, according to a recent study in JACC: Heart Failure. The study compared these patients to those receiving the standard CRT optimized with echocardiography.

A CRT device is a defibrillator that sends electrical impulses to the heart to help the chambers beat in synchronization and improves the heart's pumping function. It is an established treatment for patients with heart failure, and while it has been proven to provide many benefits, including an improved quality of life and reduced risk of death, not all patients respond to CRT.

In this study, researchers analyzed data from the Adaptive CRT trial to determine rates of hospital readmissions for heart failure patients with a CRT device. For heart failure hospitalizations the 30-day readmission rate was 19.1 percent in patients with the AdaptivCRT algorithm and 35.7 percent in patients with echo. For all-cause hospitalization, the 30-day readmission rate was 14.8 percent with the algorithm compared to 24.8 percent with echo. The risk reduction for readmission was also signficantly reduced beyond 30 days.

Heart failure was one of the first hospitalization types to be identified under the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, which reduces Medicare inpatient payments when a patient is readmitted to the hospital within 30 days of discharge for certain conditions. According to the study, the CRT algorithm showed a significant reduction in 30-day readmission rates, making it a potential safe and effective strategy to reduce readmissions and overall health care costs.

For more information: www.acc.org

Related Content

News | Heart Failure | July 09, 2020
July 9, 2020 – The Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation (MHIF) is conducting additional research on a novel hydroge
Navin Kapur, M.D., Tufts Medical Center, shows preCardia device and its anatomical positioning in the patient to treat heart failure..

Navin Kapur, M.D., Tufts Medical Center, shows preCardia device and its anatomical positioning in the patient.

News | Heart Failure | June 23, 2020
June 23, 2020 — The U.S.
Patients with worsening heart failure and reduced ejection fraction who received the investigational drug vericiguat had a significantly lower rate of cardiovascular death or heart failure hospitalization compared with those receiving a placebo, based on research presented at the American College of Cardiology’s Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC) #ACC20/#WCCardio
News | Heart Failure | March 29, 2020
March 29, 2020 — Patients with worsening heart failure and reduced ejection fraction who received the investigational
Dapagliflozin Reduces Heart Failure Worsening and Death in DAPA-HF Sub-analysis. #ACC20 #ACC2020
News | Heart Failure | March 28, 2020
March 28, 2020 — New data from a sub-analysis of the landmark Phase III...
News | Heart Failure | March 05, 2020
March 5, 2020 — Abbott recently received Breakthrough Device designation from the U.S.
Some of the new devices technologies to treat heart failure that are either in clinical trials or were recently cleared by the U.S. FDA. #heartfailure

Some of the new devices technologies to treat heart failure that are either in clinical trials or were recently cleared by the U.S. FDA. 

Feature | Heart Failure | February 21, 2020 | Dave Fornell, Editor
There are several new tools being added to the clinical armamentarium in the fight against...
Tufts Medical Center created a heart failure team approach to care for its patients. The program includes an interventional heart failure fellowship program, where interventional cardiologists learn more advanced care, as show here with an ECMO procedure being performed in a cath lab at Tufts. The interventional cardiologists learn how to better care for heart failure patients and interface with surgeons, intensivists and others on the HF care team. The operator is Nevin Kapur. Photo by Dave Fornell.

Tufts Medical Center created a heart failure team approach to care for its patients. The program includes an interventional heart failure fellowship program, where interventional cardiologists learn more advanced hemodynamic support methods, as shown here with an ECMO procedure being performed in a cath lab at Tufts. The interventional cardiologists learn how to better care for heart failure patients and interface with surgeons, intensivists and others on the HF care team. Photo by Dave Fornell.

Feature | Heart Failure | February 20, 2020 | Dave Fornell, Editor
There is no, single magic bullet in heart failure (HF) to easily reduce readmission rates or easily reverse this...
he U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Carmat's investigational device exemption (IDE) application to start a U.S. early feasibility study (EFS) of its total artificial heart.
News | Heart Failure | February 12, 2020
February 12, 2020 — The U.S.