News | AHA | October 04, 2022

HeartFlow Announces Late Breakers Presentation at the 2022 American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions

12 month data from The PRECISE Trial, the first global, prospective, randomized trial comparing diagnosis and evaluation pathways for stable chest pain, will be presented at the AHA 2022 Scientific Sessions.

12 month data from The PRECISE Trial, the first global, prospective, randomized trial comparing diagnosis and evaluation pathways for stable chest pain, will be presented at the AHA 2022 Scientific Sessions.

October 4, 2022 — HeartFlow, Inc., the leader in revolutionizing precision heart care, announced that the results of the Prospective Randomized Trial of the Optimal Evaluation of Cardiac Symptoms and Revascularization (PRECISE) will be presented as Late Breaking Science at the upcoming annual American Heart Association conference, held November 5-7 virtually and in Chicago, Illinois. 

The late breaking data will remain under embargo until the presentation: “Comparison of a Precision Care Strategy With Usual Testing to Guide Management of Stable Patients With Suspected Coronary Artery Disease: The Precise Randomized Trial” on Sunday, November 6, at 5:26 p.m. CT. It will be presented by Pamela Douglas, M.D., MACC, FASE, FAHA, Ursula Geller Professor for Research in Cardiovascular Disease, Duke University School of Medicine and study chair of the PRECISE trial. 

“The PRECISE trial is the first randomized study to evaluate clinical practice guideline recommendations for evaluating stable patients with chest pain. As such, it is a highly important next step in establishing the optimal strategy for this common problem,” said Dr. Douglas. “On behalf of the PRECISE study team, we are grateful for the partnership and contributions of the PRECISE Investigators for their fabulous work in conducting the trial including their unwavering commitment to the study despite the unforeseen challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic.” 

The PRECISE trial, in which physicians from 65 hospitals around the world enrolled 2,103 participants with symptoms of coronary artery disease (CAD), compared a guideline-based “Precision Strategy”, with a “Usual Care Testing” approach using stress testing or invasive cardiac catheterization. The PRECISE trial evaluated whether the guideline-based “Precision Strategy” improves health outcomes, efficiency, and costs of diagnosing and caring for people with suspected CAD. 

Participants enrolled in the PRECISE trial randomized to the “Precision Strategy” arm were categorized using the quantitative PROMISE Minimal Risk Score into either a minimal risk or an intermediate/high risk group. Participants in the minimal risk group were treated with medications and lifestyle modifications, but testing was deferred. Participants in the intermediate/high risk group underwent a coronary CTA. If a stenosis between 30-90% was identified, a HeartFlow FFRCT Analysis was conducted. Patients randomized to the “Usual Testing” arm underwent either noninvasive stress testing or invasive cardiac catheterization at their physician’s discretion. The primary endpoint of the PRECISE trial is a composite of major adverse cardiac events comprising death, non-fatal heart attack (myocardial infarction) or invasive catheterization showing no obstructive disease over one year. 

“We greatly appreciate the PRECISE trial leadership team and investigators around the world for their unwavering commitment to top-flight clinical science with which practitioners can guide management decisions for people with suspected CAD,” said Campbell Rogers, MD, FACC, Chief Medical Officer, HeartFlow. 

For more information: www.heartflow.com 


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