News | March 28, 2007

Israeli-Made, Portable ECG Device Uses 12 Electrodes

March 29, 2007 — Israeli scientists have developed a portable electrocardiograph machine that can transmit highly detailed data on heart activity to physicians by mobile phone. The CardioSen'C is considered an advance in portable heart-monitoring devices because it uses many more electrodes to measure heart activity and is equipped to communicate the results instantaneously to a cardiologist.

The manufacturer, SHL, says its machine can dramatically reduce deaths from heart attacks through early diagnosis of patients who might otherwise hesitate before calling a doctor or rushing to a hospital to be monitored.

Twelve electrodes are attached to the patient’s chest and upper body and the battery-powered unit is strapped on the front of the chest. Automatic digital transmission allows the electrocardiograph, or ECG, results to be transmitted at the highest quality available and at a high speed to the patient's cardiologist for instant diagnosis.

The machine is so small that readings can be taken anywhere, even while traveling. The unit is automatically connected via digital cell phone to a dedicated medical control center.

The company has also developed a system called "double transmission monitoring," which allows the control center to direct the operation of the electrocardiograph and the transmission and download of data by remote control while medical staff talk to the patient.

Patients who suffer from heart disease, are recovering from bypass treatment or simply feel they are at risk are now in a position to measure their heart activity.

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