News | ACC | March 15, 2018

Marked Increase in Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Women After Preeclampsia

Study suggests need for medical follow-up after pregnancy

Marked Increase in Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Women After Preeclampsia

March 15, 2018 — Women diagnosed with preeclampsia during pregnancy were significantly more likely to develop high blood pressure, diabetes or high cholesterol within five years compared with women who did not have preeclampsia, in a study being presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 67th Annual Scientific Session.

The study is among the first to track outcomes following a diagnosis of preeclampsia and bolsters the evidence that preeclampsia contributes to cardiovascular risk factors that were not present before pregnancy. The study, which followed women for five years, also found few women received medical follow-up aimed at preventing cardiovascular problems after preeclampsia.

Preeclampsia is a dangerous condition in which a pregnant woman develops high blood pressure and protein in the urine. Delivering the baby is the only known cure. Symptoms typically resolve within six weeks after delivery, contributing to a perception among care providers and patients that further medical monitoring is unnecessary.

However, previous studies have found women who had preeclampsia during pregnancy face a substantially higher risk of coronary heart disease, stroke and heart failure later in life. These new findings indicate signs of heart disease risk can often emerge in the first few years after a woman experiences preeclampsia.

“As providers, we’re missing the boat if we’re not adequately following up with these patients on their cardiovascular risk factors,” said Karlee Hoffman, D.O., cardiology fellow at Allegheny Health Network and the study’s lead author. “Women are highly motivated to take care of themselves when they are pregnant and after they deliver their babies, so it’s a great time to educate them on long-term cardiovascular risks and potentially intervene with aggressive lifestyle modification.”

Preeclampsia occurs in up to 7 percent of all pregnancies. However, it appears to be on the rise, potentially due to an increase in the number of women becoming pregnant after age 35.

Researchers analyzed the health records of more than 650 women treated at Allegheny Health Network between 2009 and 2015. Half had been diagnosed with preeclampsia and half were women of a similar age and racial makeup who had never had a preeclampsia diagnosis (controls). Five years of follow-up health information was available for just over 250 of the women diagnosed with preeclampsia.

Around the time of their delivery, those with preeclampsia had a higher rate of obesity, preterm delivery, babies with low birth weight and post-delivery complications. Over the following five years, those with preeclampsia were more likely to develop high blood pressure (which occurred in 32.8 percent of women with preeclampsia and 0.3 percent of controls), new-onset diabetes (which occurred in 21 percent of women with preeclampsia and zero among controls) and high cholesterol (which occurred in 3 percent of women with preeclampsia and zero among controls).                  

Of those who had a follow-up with a primary care physician after a diagnosis of preeclampsia, only one patient’s chart noted the doctor was aware of the preeclampsia diagnosis and mentioned long-term follow- up with regard to cardiovascular disease.                    

“The incidence of preeclampsia is relatively high and so is the risk of having a subsequent diagnosis of these cardiovascular risk factors,” Hoffman said. “We need to work with our obstetrics and gynecology colleagues to capture these patients and refer them to a primary care doctor or a cardiologist for more rigorous follow-up to help prevent future cardiovascular disease.”                    

“The results also showed that African-American women, women who were older at the time of their pregnancy and women with a prior history of high blood pressure or diabetes faced an especially elevated risk of high blood pressure following preeclampsia, suggesting women with these risk factors should receive even more rigorous medical follow-up,” Hoffman said.                   

Although the exact causes are unknown, it is thought that oxidative stress, which results from having too much of the unstable form of oxygen in the body, could play a role in the cardiovascular effects seen after preeclampsia. Oxidative stress has been linked with the physiological changes that contribute to coronary artery disease. To further elucidate the connections between preeclampsia and heart disease, researchers are planning a study that will use echocardiography and noninvasive pulse wave velocity to investigate heart health after preeclampsia.

For more information: www.acc.org

 

Related Women's Heart Health Content:

New Advice Will Help Women with Congenital Heart Defects Navigate Pregnancy

Diagnostic Differences in Women’s Heart Health

VIDEO: Differences in Cardiac Complications and Presentation Between Men and Women — Interview with Cindy Grines, M.D.

Pregnancy-Related Heart Failure Strikes Black Women Twice as Often as Other Races

Cardiac Imaging Reveals Roots of Preeclampsia Damage in Pregnant Women

VIDEO: Sex Differences in Diagnosing Heart Disease in Women — Interview with Doreen DeFaria Yeh, M.D.

VIDEO: How to Build a Successful Women’s Heart Center — Interview with Malissa Wood, M.D.

Find more articles on women's heart issues in the Women's Cardiovascular Health channel

 

Related Content: ACC 2018 Late-Breaking Trials

Related Content

The American College of Cardiology (ACC) released a list of the latest practice-changing presentations at the ACC.20 annual meeting March 28-30, 2020, in Chicago. This includes five late-breaking clinical trial (LBCT) sessions and three featured clinical research sessions. There also are two LBCT deep-dive sessions where the experts will break down the hottest trials and attendees can find out what the impact might be on the practice of cardiology and patients.
Feature | ACC | March 27, 2020 | Dave Fornell, Editor
Here is the list of American College of Cardiology (ACC) practice-
ACC Cancels 2020 Conference Amid Coronavirus Concerns. #COVID19 #coronavirus #2019nCoV
Feature | ACC | March 09, 2020 | Dave Fornell, Editor
March 9, 2020 — Less than week after the American College of Cardiolog...
American College of Cardiology Names Douglas Drachman Next Annual Scientific Session Vice Chair

Image courtesy of Massachusetts General Hospital

News | ACC | October 08, 2019
Douglas Drachman, M.D., FACC, has been selected as the next vice chair of the American College of Cardiology’s (ACC)...
SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps pressure readings onto angiogram. Results from an international study presented at ACC 2019 indicates pressure readings obtained using iFR (instantaneous wave-free ratio, also referred to as instant wave-free ratio or instant flow reserve) in coronary arteries may localize stenoses that remain after interventions. FFR in the cath lab.

SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps pressure readings onto angiogram. Results from an international study presented at ACC 2019 indicates pressure readings obtained using iFR (instantaneous wave-free ratio, also referred to as instant wave-free ratio or instant flow reserve) in coronary arteries may localize stenoses that remain after interventions.

Feature | ACC | March 27, 2019 | Greg Freiherr, Contributing Editor
The fingerprints of value-added medicine were all over products and works-in-progress on the exhibit floor of the a

The opening late-breaking trial at ACC 2019 is the Apple Heart Study, a large-scale, app-based study to identify atrial fibrillation using a smartwatch. Earlier, smaller trials showed this approach might be used in a population health application to proactively identify AFib patients earlier.

Feature | ACC | March 19, 2019
The American College of Cardiology (ACC) released a list of the late
A patient who received HeartMate III LVAD system at ACC.18. The HeartMate 3 was the topic of of the the key late-breaking trials at #ACC18

A patient who received the HeartMate III LVAD system showing off his external battery pack. He served as a patient ambassador in the Abbott booth at ACC.18. The HeartMate III, with its magnetic levitated pump, showed a big reduction in clotting over previous LVADs in a key late-breaking trial at this year's conference.

Feature | ACC | March 27, 2018 | Dave Fornell
There were several notable presentations of new data on cardiovascular technologies at the recent 2018 American Colle
Drug Stops Dangerous Bleeding in Patients Taking Factor Xa Inhibitors

Connolly 

News | ACC | March 22, 2018
March 22, 2018 — The experimental drug...
Videos | ACC | March 21, 2018
DAIC Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new technologies on the expo floor at
ACC 2018 Late-Breaking Trials Announced
News | ACC | March 21, 2018
Here is a list of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2018 annual meeting late-breaking clinical trials presente
Inhaled Therapy Ineffective in Difficult-to-Treat Heart Failure at ACC 2018.

Image from presentation, "Inorganic Nitrite Delivery to Improve Exercise Capacity in HFpEF: The INDIE-HFpEF Trial," Borlaug

News | ACC | March 20, 2018
March 20, 2018 — Four weeks of treatment with a novel inhaled medication failed to improve exercise capacity, daily a
Overlay Init