News | Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2019

SCCT Releases New Guideline for CT Use During TAVR

Consensus document is first update since 2012, reflecting volumes of new data gathered in interim

SCCT Releases New Guideline for CT Use During TAVR

January 8, 2019 — The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) has released a new expert consensus document for computed tomography (CT) imaging to improve outcomes for patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI)/transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). The 2019 guideline, a result of a consensus statement of experts in the field, was published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. The new recommendations are an update to the 2012 SCCT consensus document on computed tomography imaging in context of TAVI/TAVR.

“The 2019 consensus statement represents a contemporary assessment of the role of computed tomography imaging that will serve as important guidance to a field that has seen rapid growth over the last six years,” said consensus statement author Jonathon A. Leipsic, M.D., FSCCT, of the University of British Columbia. “This guidance will in turn help ensure the appropriate use of CT to help inform clinical practice and continue to drive improvements in clinical outcomes for the patients we serve.”

Watch the VIDEO: What to Look for in CT Structural Heart Planning Software, an interview with Leipsic at SCCT 2016

TAVI/TAVR is a treatment strategy for patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis (narrowing of the exit of the left ventricle). The option for the non-surgical TAVI/TAVR treatment has now expanded from those who are ineligible for surgery or high-risk surgical candidates to also include patients who are at an intermediate risk for conventional surgical valve replacement.

“The role of computed tomography, which was initially used primarily for evaluating peripheral access, has grown substantially,” said author Philipp Blanke, M.D., FSCCT, of the University of British Columbia. “It is now the gold standard for accurately sizing the annulus, determining the risk of annular injury and coronary occlusion and providing predictions in advance of the TAVI/TAVR procedure.”

The updated consensus statement has been developed to better reflect the substantial volume of new data that has been published since 2012 describing the use of computed tomographic angiography in TAVI/TAVR planning and post-procedural assessment. The 2019 consensus document includes:

  • Recommendations for CT acquisition prior to TAVI/TAVR;
  • Recommendations for the sizing and reporting of the aortic valve, annulus and outflow tract;
  • Recommendations for the reporting of fluoroscopic angulation;
  • Recommendations for the reporting of vascular access, coronary artery, and non-cardiac, non-vascular findings; and
  • Recommendations for the reporting of post- TAVI/TAVR and pre-VIV scans

The recommendations were written by 11 experts and based on the level of consensus: strong (≥9 in agreement), moderate (7-8) and weak (6). Recommendations with less than six of the author group in support of the statement were not adopted into the 2019 expert consensus document.

Watch the VIDEO: The Essentials of CT Transcatheter Valve Imaging, an inteview with Leipsic at SCCT 2018.

For more information: www.scct.org

Reference

1. Blanke P., Weir-McCall J.R., Achenbach S., et al. Computed tomography imaging in the context of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) / transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR): An expert consensus document of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Jan. 7, 2019. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcct.2018.11.008

Related Content

ASNC Announces Multisocietal Cardiac Amyloidosis Imaging Consensus
News | Cardiac Imaging | September 09, 2019
The American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) published a new expert consensus document along with eight other...
Philips Debuts Cardiac Ultrasound and Enterprise Informatics Offerings at ESC 2019
News | Cardiac Imaging | August 30, 2019
Philips will showcase its latest cardiac care innovations at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2019,...
A high-fidelity 3-D tractography of the left ventricle heart muscle fibers of a mouse

Figure 1. A high-fidelity 3-D tractography of the left ventricle heart muscle fibers of a mouse from Amsterdam Ph.D. researcher Gustav Strijkers.

News | Cardiac Imaging | June 07, 2019
The Amsterdam University Medical Center has won MR Solutions’ Image of the Year 2019 award for the best molecular...
At #ACC.19, Siemens unveiled a version of its go.Top platform optimized for cardiovascular imaging. The newly packaged scanner can generate the data needed to do CT-based FFR (fractional flow reserve).

At #ACC.19, Siemens unveiled a version of its go.Top platform optimized for cardiovascular imaging. The newly packaged scanner can generate the data needed to do CT-based FFR (fractional flow reserve). Photo by Greg Freiherr

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 22, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Reflecting a trend toward the increased use of ...
SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps iFR pressure readings onto angiogram.

SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps iFR pressure readings onto angiogram. Results from an international study presented at #ACC19 show that pressure readings in coronary arteries may identify locations of stenoses remaining after cardiac cath interventions.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 18, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
As many as one in four patients who undergo cath lab interventions can benefit from a technology that identifies the
Jennifer N. A. Silva, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Mo., describes “mixed reality” at ACC19 Future Hub.

Jennifer N. A. Silva, M.D., a pediatric cardiologist at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Mo., describes “mixed reality” at ACC19 Future Hub.

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 17, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Virtual reality (VR) and its less immersive kin, augmented reality (AR), are gaining traction in some medical applica
WVU cardiology chief Partho Sengupta, M.D., describes at ACC 2019 how artificial intelligence already helps cardiologists in echocardiography.

WVU cardiology chief Partho Sengupta, M.D., describes at ACC 2019 how artificial intelligence already helps cardiologists in echocardiography. Photo by Greg Freiherr

Feature | Cardiac Imaging | March 16, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Machine learning is already having an enormous impact on cardiology, automatically calculating measurements in echoca
Podcast | Cardiac Imaging | March 15, 2019
Debate About Coronary Testing Highlights ACC Session
Podcast | Cardiac Imaging | March 12, 2019
How smart algorithms might reduce the burden of modern practice
Overlay Init