News | Wearables | May 10, 2021

Vendors and ACC Collaborate With Consumer Technology Association to Help Clinicians and Patients Understand Cardiovascular Devices

Philips, Samsung, Abbott and Omron join the initiative to develop evaluation criteria that companies can use to better educate clinicians as they recommend devices to their patients

The Consumer Technology Association (CTA) is collaborating with the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and several vendors on best practices for device and app and wearable device makers to provide deeper understanding of products that manage cardiovascular health. #wearables

The Consumer Technology Association (CTA) is collaborating with the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and several vendors on best practices for device and app and wearable device makers to provide deeper understanding of products that manage cardiovascular health. 

May 10, 2021 – Today, the Consumer Technology Association (CTA) announced it is collaborating with the American College of Cardiology (ACC) on best practices for device and app and wearable device makers to provide deeper understanding of products that manage cardiovascular health. The working group, which includes members from ACC, Philips, Samsung, Abbott, Omron, and others will develop evaluation criteria that companies can use to better educate clinicians as they recommend devices to their patients.

Clinicians find value in using technology to better monitor and manage a patient’s health. But given the large variety of devices available on the market today, clinicians are not always certain which type is best suited to track a specific disease. Through this project, experts from the tech sector and health care setting will build guidance for device manufacturers in how to communicate the capability of individual products to clinicians and support that appropriate devices are being recommended for use by patients.

“The digital transformation of health care delivery is a priority for the ACC, and we are committed to leading the way in finding and implementing innovative ways to transform cardiovascular care and improve heart health,” said John Rumsfeld, M.D., Ph.D., FACC, chief innovation officer and chief science officer, ACC. “Through this collaborative effort we’re spanning health care and tech to give both clinicians and patients confidence when using health care devices to monitor and treat cardiovascular disease.”

“Health tech devices are an extension of clinicians’ practice, so when you’re unable to see a doctor or experience symptoms the device can step in and report the information to your provider,” said Rene Quashie, VP, digital health, CTA. “Frameworks like ours will help clinicians make an informed recommendation to their patients with the goal of providing holistic care and, ultimately, better outcomes for patients.”

A multidisciplinary group of leaders in AI and digital health recognized gaps in knowledge around implementing health care devices into patient care and determined the need for best practices during discussions at ACC’s Applied Health Innovation Consortium 2020 summit on virtual care, of which CTA is a member.

So far, the biggest challenge facing device manufacturers is enabling clinicians to use tech solutions and educating them on when to integrate tech into their workflow. This project aims to provide device manufacturers with a best practices framework to give clinicians necessary device selection information, such as standards-based metrics for accuracy, privacy and security.

This effort, which will look at three use cases of devices – prevention, screening or diagnosis, and health management or treatment – is co-chaired by Mike McConnell, M.D., MSEE, senior clinical lead, Google Health and clinical professor, Stanford School of Medicine: and Ritu Thamman, M.D., FACC, ACC Innovation Work Group member. In addition, the working group members include representatives from Abbott, BioIntellisense, HP, Omron Healthcare Inc., Philips, Samsung Electronics, Valencell and Well Being Digital Limited (WBD101).

“The digital healthcare market is growing rapidly, and clinicians need to be confident in the appropriateness of devices for different patient groups,” Thamman said. “By providing best practices for new apps and devices, clinicians and patients can be assured that they are using the most appropriate digital tools to enhance care options and potentially improve patient outcomes.”

This work also builds upon a unique digital health whitepaper released last year by CTA and the Heart Rhythm Society that recommended best practices for using wearable technology to manage personal health, including detecting and monitoring cardiovascular biometrics.

The working group will hold a series of meetings in 2021 and is scheduled to release the best practices document by the end of the year.

Watch the related VIDEO: ACC Efforts to Advance Evidence-based Implementation of AI in Cardiovascular Care — an interview with John Rumsfeld, M.D.

About Consumer Technology Association (CTA)

As North America’s largest technology trade association, CTA is the tech sector. Our members are the world’s leading innovators – from startups to global brands – helping support more than 18 million American jobs. CTA owns and produces CES – the most influential tech event in the world. Find us at CTA.tech

The American College of Cardiology envisions a world where innovation and knowledge optimize cardiovascular care and outcomes. As the professional home for the entire cardiovascular care team, the mission of the College and its 54,000 members is to transform cardiovascular care and to improve heart health. The ACC bestows credentials upon cardiovascular professionals who meet stringent qualifications and leads in the formation of health policy, standards and guidelines. The College also provides professional medical education, disseminates cardiovascular research through its world-renowned JACC Journals, operates national registries to measure and improve care, and offers cardiovascular accreditation to hospitals and institutions. For more, visit acc.org.

Wearable Cardiac Devices Market Will See Rapid Expansion in Coming Years

Find more content on wearable cardiac devices

Related Content

Some of the top technology news from ACC 2021. Top left, the LAAOS III trial showed benefit when surgeons seal off the LAA during other open heart procedures. Bottom left, the ReCor Paradise renal denervation system helped lower blood pressure in patients who did not respond to medication. Top right, for patients with both heart failure and AFib it makes no differences is therapy is focused on controlling the heart rhythm or heart rate. Bottom right, the FLOWER-MI trial found no benefit to FFR-guided PCI.

Some of the top technology news from ACC 2021. Top left, the LAAOS III trial showed benefit when surgeons seal off the LAA during other open heart procedures. Bottom left, the ReCor Paradise renal denervation system helped lower blood pressure in patients who did not respond to medication. Top right, for patients with both heart failure and AFib it makes no difference if therapy is focused on controlling the heart rhythm or heart rate. Bottom right, the FLOWER-MI trial found no benefit to FFR-guided PCI in STEMI with multi-vessel disease.

Feature | ACC | June 08, 2021 | By Dave Fornell, Editor
Here are the top 10 takeaways from the late-breaking studies on cardiovascular technologies presented at the 2021 ...
AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY (ACC) Late-breaking clinical trial study presentations at ACC.21. @ACC21 @ACC2021
Feature | ACC | May 18, 2021 | Dave Fornell, Editor
The latest cardiology practice-changing scientific breakthrough, late-breaking study presentations have been announce
To help monitor the health of ACC 2021 in-person attendees for signs of COVID infection, the meeting will use BioIntelliSense's wearable BioButton continuous wireless temperature and vital signs monitoring. The wearable monitor is the size of a coin and is disposable.

To help monitor the health of ACC 2021 in-person attendees for signs of COVID infection, the meeting will use BioIntelliSense's wearable BioButton continuous wireless temperature and vital signs monitoring. The wearable monitor is the size of a coin and is disposable.

News | ACC | February 09, 2021 | By Dave Fornell, Editor
UPDATE Feb 22, 2021 — ...
The American College of Cardiology (ACC) released a list of the latest practice-changing presentations at the ACC.20 annual meeting March 28-30, 2020, in Chicago. This includes five late-breaking clinical trial (LBCT) sessions and three featured clinical research sessions. There also are two LBCT deep-dive sessions where the experts will break down the hottest trials and attendees can find out what the impact might be on the practice of cardiology and patients.
Feature | ACC | April 09, 2020 | Dave Fornell, Editor
Here is the list of American College of Cardiology (ACC) practice-
ACC Cancels 2020 Conference Amid Coronavirus Concerns. #COVID19 #coronavirus #2019nCoV
Feature | ACC | March 09, 2020 | Dave Fornell, Editor
March 9, 2020 — Less than week after the American College of Cardiolog...
American College of Cardiology Names Douglas Drachman Next Annual Scientific Session Vice Chair

Image courtesy of Massachusetts General Hospital

News | ACC | October 08, 2019
Douglas Drachman, M.D., FACC, has been selected as the next vice chair of the American College of Cardiology’s (ACC)...
SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps pressure readings onto angiogram. Results from an international study presented at ACC 2019 indicates pressure readings obtained using iFR (instantaneous wave-free ratio, also referred to as instant wave-free ratio or instant flow reserve) in coronary arteries may localize stenoses that remain after interventions. FFR in the cath lab.

SyncVision iFR Co-registration from Philips Healthcare maps pressure readings onto angiogram. Results from an international study presented at ACC 2019 indicates pressure readings obtained using iFR (instantaneous wave-free ratio, also referred to as instant wave-free ratio or instant flow reserve) in coronary arteries may localize stenoses that remain after interventions.

Feature | ACC | March 27, 2019 | Greg Freiherr, Contributing Editor
The fingerprints of value-added medicine were all over products and works-in-progress on the exhibit floor of the a

The opening late-breaking trial at ACC 2019 is the Apple Heart Study, a large-scale, app-based study to identify atrial fibrillation using a smartwatch. Earlier, smaller trials showed this approach might be used in a population health application to proactively identify AFib patients earlier.

Feature | ACC | March 19, 2019
The American College of Cardiology (ACC) released a list of the late
A patient who received HeartMate III LVAD system at ACC.18. The HeartMate 3 was the topic of of the the key late-breaking trials at #ACC18

A patient who received the HeartMate III LVAD system showing off his external battery pack. He served as a patient ambassador in the Abbott booth at ACC.18. The HeartMate III, with its magnetic levitated pump, showed a big reduction in clotting over previous LVADs in a key late-breaking trial at this year's conference.

Feature | ACC | March 27, 2018 | Dave Fornell
There were several notable presentations of new data on cardiovascular technologies at the recent 2018 American Colle